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RET, Gene Translocation

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Expand Collapse RET  - General Description RET is a gene that provides the code for making a protein that is involved in signaling within cells, acting as the receptor for chemical signals that help the cell respond to its surroundings. The RET protein is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that is found on the cell surface. When certain molecules known as growth factors attach (bind to) the external portion of the receptor, a complex chain of chemical reactions is triggered inside the cell. The chain reaction relays the signal that was received by the receptor, telling the cell to undergo certain changes, such as dividing or maturing to take on specialized functions. This protein seems to be essential for normal development of several kinds of nerve cells, including nerves in the intestine and the autonomic nervous system, which controls heart rate and other functions that occur without being thought about. The RET protein is also needed for normal kidney development and the production of sperm. Chromosomal rearrangements involving the RET gene are one of the most common causes of a nonhereditary form of thyroid cancer called papillary thyroid carcinoma (RET/PTC). Another type of thyroid cancer, medullary thyroid carcinoma, also can be caused by mutations in the RET gene. These mutations are said to be somatic because, instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), they are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous. Source: Genetics Home ReferenceRET is a gene that provides the code for making a protein that is involved in signaling within cells, acting as the receptor for chemical signals that help the cell respond to its surroundings. The RET protein is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that is found on the cell surface. When certain molecules known as growth factors attach (bind to) the external portion of the receptor, a complex chain of chemical reactions is triggered inside the cell. The chain reaction relays the signal that was received by the receptor, telling the cell to undergo certain changes, such as dividing or maturing to take on specialized functions. This protein seems to be essential for normal development of several kinds of nerve cells, including nerves in the intestine and the autonomic nervous system, which controls heart rate and other functions that occur without being thought about. The RET protein is also needed for normal kidney development and the production of sperm. Chromosomal rearrangements involving the RET gene are one of the most common causes of a nonhereditary form of thyroid cancer called papillary thyroid carcinoma (RET/PTC). Another type of thyroid cancer, medullary thyroid carcinoma, also can be caused by mutations in the RET gene. These mutations are said to be somatic because, instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), they are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous. Source: Genetics Home Reference
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RET is a gene that provides the code for making a protein that is involved in signaling within cells, acting as the receptor for chemical signals that help the cell respond to its surroundings. The RET protein is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that is found on the cell surface. When certain molecules known as growth factors attach (bind to) the external portion of the receptor, a complex chain of chemical reactions is triggered inside the cell. The chain reaction relays the signal that was received by the receptor, telling the cell to undergo certain changes, such as dividing or maturing to take on specialized functions. This protein seems to be essential for normal development of several kinds of nerve cells, including nerves in the intestine and the autonomic nervous system, which controls heart rate and other functions that occur without being thought about. The RET protein is also needed for normal kidney development and the production of sperm.

Chromosomal rearrangements involving the RET gene are one of the most common causes of a nonhereditary form of thyroid cancer called papillary thyroid carcinoma (RET/PTC). Another type of thyroid cancer, medullary thyroid carcinoma, also can be caused by mutations in the RET gene. These mutations are said to be somatic because, instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), they are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
RET is a gene that provides the code for making a protein that is involved in signaling within cells, acting as the receptor for chemical signals that help the cell respond to its surroundings. The RET protein is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that is found on the cell surface. When certain molecules known as growth factors attach (bind to) the external portion of the receptor, a complex chain of chemical reactions is triggered inside the cell. The chain reaction relays the signal that was received by the receptor, telling the cell to undergo certain changes, such as dividing or maturing to take on specialized functions. This protein seems to be essential for normal development of several kinds of nerve cells, including nerves in the intestine and the autonomic nervous system, which controls heart rate and other functions that occur without being thought about. The RET protein is also needed for normal kidney development and the production of sperm.

Chromosomal rearrangements involving the RET gene are one of the most common causes of a nonhereditary form of thyroid cancer called papillary thyroid carcinoma (RET/PTC). Another type of thyroid cancer, medullary thyroid carcinoma, also can be caused by mutations in the RET gene. These mutations are said to be somatic because, instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), they are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (G) - Gene, (M) - Mutation
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Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02219711 Phase 1/1b Study of MGCD516 in Patients With Advanced Cancer Phase 1/1b Study of MGCD516 in Patients With Advanced Cancer MGH Open G
MGH has many open clinical trials for other cancers not shown on the Targeted Cancer Care website. They can be found on the MassGeneral.org clinical trials search page.

Additional clinical trials may be applicable to your search criteria, but they may not be available at MGH. These clinical trials can typically be found by searching the clinicaltrials.gov website.
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