Searching On:

Disease:

Gene:

PTEN, K267fs*9 (c.799delA)

View:
Expand Collapse No disease selected  - General Description
Mass General Hospital Cancer Center treats patients with many cancer types. To learn more about the different cancer types that can be treated at the Cancer Center, please visit the Cancer Center website at the following page: http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/services/
Expand Collapse PTEN  - General Description PTEN is a gene that provides the code for making a protein called phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Found in almost all tissues in the body, this protein acts as a tumor suppressor. That is, it keeps cells from growing and dividing too fast or in an uncontrolled way. The PTEN protein is part of a signaling pathway that tells cells to stop dividing and triggers their self-destruction (apoptosis). It also may help control how cells move (migration), stick to other cells (adhesion) and protect their genetic information. Somatic mutations in PTEN are among the most common genetic changes found in human cancers. Instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), somatic mutations are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous. PTEN may be the most frequently mutated gene in prostate cancer and endometrial cancer. These mutations usually result in a defective protein that has lost its ability to be a tumor suppressor. Such mutations also are found in certain brain tumors (glioblastomas and astrocytomas) and melanoma of the skin. Loss of PTEN expression is also a common way by which PTEN activity can be reduced and the PI3K pathway can be activated. Several related conditions caused by inherited mutations in PTEN are grouped together as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome. One of these conditions is Cowden syndrome, which is characterized by the growth of many hamartomas and an increased risk of developing breast, thyroid or endometrial cancer. Mutations that cause Cowden syndrome lead to production of a defective PTEN protein that cannot stop cell division or trigger apoptosis, which contributes to the development of hamartomas and cancerous tumors. Source: Genetics Home ReferenceThe PTEN gene encodes a lipid phosphatase that antagonizes oncogenic PI3K/AKT signaling via dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) at the cell membrane. Cancer-associated genomic alterations in PTEN result in PTEN inactivation and thus increased activity of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Somatic mutations of PTEN occur in multiple malignancies, including gliomas, melanoma, prostate, endometrial, breast, ovarian, renal and lung cancers. Germline PTEN mutations are associated with inherited hamartoma syndromes, including Cowden syndrome. Loss of PTEN expression is also a common way by which PTEN activity can be reduced and the PI3K pathway can be activated. Source: Genetics Home Reference
CLICK IMAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION
PTEN is a gene that provides the code for making a protein called phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Found in almost all tissues in the body, this protein acts as a tumor suppressor. That is, it keeps cells from growing and dividing too fast or in an uncontrolled way. The PTEN protein is part of a signaling pathway that tells cells to stop dividing and triggers their self-destruction (apoptosis). It also may help control how cells move (migration), stick to other cells (adhesion) and protect their genetic information.

Somatic mutations in PTEN are among the most common genetic changes found in human cancers. Instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), somatic mutations are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous. PTEN may be the most frequently mutated gene in prostate cancer and endometrial cancer. These mutations usually result in a defective protein that has lost its ability to be a tumor suppressor. Such mutations also are found in certain brain tumors (glioblastomas and astrocytomas) and melanoma of the skin. Loss of PTEN expression is also a common way by which PTEN activity can be reduced and the PI3K pathway can be activated.

Several related conditions caused by inherited mutations in PTEN are grouped together as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome. One of these conditions is Cowden syndrome, which is characterized by the growth of many hamartomas and an increased risk of developing breast, thyroid or endometrial cancer. Mutations that cause Cowden syndrome lead to production of a defective PTEN protein that cannot stop cell division or trigger apoptosis, which contributes to the development of hamartomas and cancerous tumors.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
The PTEN gene encodes a lipid phosphatase that antagonizes oncogenic PI3K/AKT signaling via dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) at the cell membrane. Cancer-associated genomic alterations in PTEN result in PTEN inactivation and thus increased activity of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Somatic mutations of PTEN occur in multiple malignancies, including gliomas, melanoma, prostate, endometrial, breast, ovarian, renal and lung cancers. Germline PTEN mutations are associated with inherited hamartoma syndromes, including Cowden syndrome. Loss of PTEN expression is also a common way by which PTEN activity can be reduced and the PI3K pathway can be activated.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
Expand Collapse K267fs*9 (c.799delA)  in PTEN
The PTEN K267 frameshift mutation arises from a single nucleotide deletion (799delA) and results in a truncated protein.
The PTEN K267 frameshift mutation arises from a single nucleotide deletion (799delA) and results in a truncated protein.

Share with your Physican

Print information for your Physician.

Print information

Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (G) - Gene, (M) - Mutation
Trial Status: No record found.
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
MGH has many open clinical trials for other cancers not shown on the Targeted Cancer Care website. They can be found on the MassGeneral.org clinical trials search page.

Additional clinical trials may be applicable to your search criteria, but they may not be available at MGH. These clinical trials can typically be found by searching the clinicaltrials.gov website.
There are currently no clinical trials available for your selection. New clinical trials are being approved every day. Please continue to check back for updates.
Trial Status: No record found.

Share with your Physican

Print information for your Physician.

Print information