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KRAS, Activating Mutations

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Expand Collapse KRAS  - General Description KRAS is a gene that provides the code for making a protein, KRAS, which is involved primarily in controlling cell division. This protein is part of the MAP kinase signaling cascade (RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK) that relays chemical signals from outside the cell to the cell's nucleus and is primarily involved in controlling cell division. KRAS is an enzyme (a GTPase) that converts a molecule called GTP into GDP. When KRAS is attached (bound) to GDP, it's in its "off" position and can't send signals to the nucleus. But when a GTP molecule arrives and binds to KRAS, KRAS is activated and sends its signal, and then it converts the GTP into GDP and returns to the "off" position. When mutated, KRAS can act as an oncogene, causing normal cells to become cancerous. The mutations can shift the KRAS protein into the "on" position all the time. KRAS mutations are common in pancreatic, lung and colorectal cancers. These KRAS mutations are said to be somatic, because instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), they are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous. Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has identified KRAS mutations across a broad-spectrum of cancer types. The highest incidence of KRAS mutations have been found in pancreatic cancer (70%), colon cancer (30%), lung cancer (25%), cholangiocarcinoma (15-20%), acute myeloid leukemia (15-20%) and endometrial cancer (15-20%). Across the other major tumor types, KRAS mutations have been found in less than 10% of cases that have been tested. Source: Genetics Home ReferenceKRAS (v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) is a member of the closely related RAS gene family that includes NRAS and HRAS. These RAS members are small GTPases that transduce extracellular signals to the downstream effectors RAF, PI3K and RALGDS. Ras members are involved in regulating diverse cellular processes including survival, proliferation and differentiation. While activating mutations in the RAS genes lead to sustained GTPase activation and are tumorigenic, each oncogene exerts clear phenotypic differences. KRAS is the most frequently mutated gene from the RAS family, occurring in approximately 20% of all human cancers. Mutational hotspots in KRAS reside primarily in amino acid residues 12, 13 or 61 and function to promote hyperproliferation and suppress differentiation. Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has identified KRAS mutations across a broad-spectrum of cancer types. The highest incidence of KRAS mutations have been found in pancreatic cancer (70%), colon cancer (30%), lung cancer (25%), cholangiocarcinoma (15-20%), acute myeloid leukemia (15-20%) and endometrial cancer (15-20%). Across the other major tumor types, KRAS mutations have been found in less than 10% of cases that have been tested. Source: Genetics Home Reference
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KRAS is a gene that provides the code for making a protein, KRAS, which is involved primarily in controlling cell division. This protein is part of the MAP kinase signaling cascade (RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK) that relays chemical signals from outside the cell to the cell's nucleus and is primarily involved in controlling cell division. KRAS is an enzyme (a GTPase) that converts a molecule called GTP into GDP. When KRAS is attached (bound) to GDP, it's in its "off" position and can't send signals to the nucleus. But when a GTP molecule arrives and binds to KRAS, KRAS is activated and sends its signal, and then it converts the GTP into GDP and returns to the "off" position.

When mutated, KRAS can act as an oncogene, causing normal cells to become cancerous. The mutations can shift the KRAS protein into the "on" position all the time. KRAS mutations are common in pancreatic, lung and colorectal cancers. These KRAS mutations are said to be somatic, because instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), they are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous.

Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has identified KRAS mutations across a broad-spectrum of cancer types. The highest incidence of KRAS mutations have been found in pancreatic cancer (70%), colon cancer (30%), lung cancer (25%), cholangiocarcinoma (15-20%), acute myeloid leukemia (15-20%) and endometrial cancer (15-20%). Across the other major tumor types, KRAS mutations have been found in less than 10% of cases that have been tested.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
KRAS (v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) is a member of the closely related RAS gene family that includes NRAS and HRAS. These RAS members are small GTPases that transduce extracellular signals to the downstream effectors RAF, PI3K and RALGDS. Ras members are involved in regulating diverse cellular processes including survival, proliferation and differentiation. While activating mutations in the RAS genes lead to sustained GTPase activation and are tumorigenic, each oncogene exerts clear phenotypic differences. KRAS is the most frequently mutated gene from the RAS family, occurring in approximately 20% of all human cancers. Mutational hotspots in KRAS reside primarily in amino acid residues 12, 13 or 61 and function to promote hyperproliferation and suppress differentiation.

Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has identified KRAS mutations across a broad-spectrum of cancer types. The highest incidence of KRAS mutations have been found in pancreatic cancer (70%), colon cancer (30%), lung cancer (25%), cholangiocarcinoma (15-20%), acute myeloid leukemia (15-20%) and endometrial cancer (15-20%). Across the other major tumor types, KRAS mutations have been found in less than 10% of cases that have been tested.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (G) - Gene, (M) - Mutation
Trial Status: Showing all 4 results Per Page:
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02327169 A Phase 1B Study of MLN2480 in Combination With MLN0128 or Alisertib, or Paclitaxel, or Cetuximab, or Irinotecan in Adult Patients With Advanced Nonhematologic Malignancies A Phase 1B Study of MLN2480 in Combination With MLN0128 or Alisertib, or Paclitaxel, or Cetuximab, or Irinotecan in Adult Patients With Advanced Nonhematologic Malignancies MGH Open G
NCT02857270 A Study of LY3214996 Administered Alone or in Combination With Other Agents in Participants With Advanced/Metastatic Cancer A Study of LY3214996 Administered Alone or in Combination With Other Agents in Participants With Advanced/Metastatic Cancer MGH Open G
NCT02974725 Study of LXH254 and LTT462 in NSCLC Study of LXH254 and LTT462 in NSCLC MGH Open G
NCT02079740 Trametinib and Navitoclax in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors Trametinib and Navitoclax in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors MGH Open G
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Additional clinical trials may be applicable to your search criteria, but they may not be available at MGH. These clinical trials can typically be found by searching the clinicaltrials.gov website.
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