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HDM2/MDM2

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Mass General Hospital Cancer Center treats patients with many cancer types. To learn more about the different cancer types that can be treated at the Cancer Center, please visit the Cancer Center website at the following page: http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/services/
Expand Collapse HDM2/MDM2  - General Description HDM2, the human version of mouse MDM2 is a protein that negatively regulates the TP53 tumor suppressor protein. HDM2/MDM2 is one of a family of proteins in the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway that regulate proteins by targeting them for degradation. HDM2/MDM2 binds to and inactivates TP53, which is a tumor suppressor that causes growth arrest when cells suffer trauma or DNA damage. Growth arrest allows cells to repair their DNA prior to resuming growth. In some cancers, HDM2/MDM2 is genetically altered, causing production of more HDM2/MDM2 than is normally in cells. This abundance of HDM2/MDM2 binds to TP53, inducing its degradation, and without TP53, the cell cannot stop growing to repair damaged DNA before continuing to divide. Cell division that continues despite damaged DNA is more likely to lead to cancer. Source: HDM2, the human version of mouse MDM2 is a protein that negatively regulates the TP53 tumor suppressor protein. HDM2/MDM2 is one of a family of proteins in the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway that regulate proteins by targeting them for degradation. HDM2/MDM2 binds to and inactivates TP53, which is a tumor suppressor that causes growth arrest when cells suffer trauma or DNA damage. Growth arrest allows cells to repair their DNA prior to resuming growth. In some cancers, HDM2/MDM2 is genetically altered, causing production of more HDM2/MDM2 than is normally in cells. This abundance of HDM2/MDM2 binds to TP53, inducing its degradation, and without TP53, the cell cannot stop growing to repair damaged DNA before continuing to divide. Cell division that continues despite damaged DNA is more likely to lead to cancer. Source:
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HDM2, the human version of mouse MDM2 is a protein that negatively regulates the TP53 tumor suppressor protein. HDM2/MDM2 is one of a family of proteins in the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway that regulate proteins by targeting them for degradation. HDM2/MDM2 binds to and inactivates TP53, which is a tumor suppressor that causes growth arrest when cells suffer trauma or DNA damage. Growth arrest allows cells to repair their DNA prior to resuming growth. In some cancers, HDM2/MDM2 is genetically altered, causing production of more HDM2/MDM2 than is normally in cells. This abundance of HDM2/MDM2 binds to TP53, inducing its degradation, and without TP53, the cell cannot stop growing to repair damaged DNA before continuing to divide. Cell division that continues despite damaged DNA is more likely to lead to cancer.

Source:
HDM2, the human version of mouse MDM2 is a protein that negatively regulates the TP53 tumor suppressor protein. HDM2/MDM2 is one of a family of proteins in the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway that regulate proteins by targeting them for degradation. HDM2/MDM2 binds to and inactivates TP53, which is a tumor suppressor that causes growth arrest when cells suffer trauma or DNA damage. Growth arrest allows cells to repair their DNA prior to resuming growth. In some cancers, HDM2/MDM2 is genetically altered, causing production of more HDM2/MDM2 than is normally in cells. This abundance of HDM2/MDM2 binds to TP53, inducing its degradation, and without TP53, the cell cannot stop growing to repair damaged DNA before continuing to divide. Cell division that continues despite damaged DNA is more likely to lead to cancer.

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The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.

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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (G) - Gene
Trial Status: No record found.
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
MGH has many open clinical trials for other cancers not shown on the Targeted Cancer Care website. They can be found on the MassGeneral.org clinical trials search page.

Additional clinical trials may be applicable to your search criteria, but they may not be available at MGH. These clinical trials can typically be found by searching the clinicaltrials.gov website.
There are currently no clinical trials available for your selection. New clinical trials are being approved every day. Please continue to check back for updates.
Trial Status: No record found.

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