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FGFR2, Gene Fusion

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Mass General Hospital Cancer Center treats patients with many cancer types. To learn more about the different cancer types that can be treated at the Cancer Center, please visit the Cancer Center website at the following page: http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/services/
Expand Collapse FGFR2  - General Description FGFR is a gene that provides the code for making a protein called fibroblast growth factor receptor. This receptor is located on the surface of cells. FGFR has at least 4 subtypes, FGFR 1,2,3, and 4. When certain growth factors (proteins that stimulate cell growth and division) bind to an FGFR receptor, this activates a signaling system within the cell that causes the cell to undergo certain changes. In their normal role, the FGFR proteins play crucial roles in cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, and survival. In certain types of cancers, genetic changes in the FGFR gene have been found. These changes include either amplification (more of the receptor is made than in normal cells), translocation (the gene has moved position such that it is under different regulation, causing more of the receptor to be made than in normal cells), or mutation (changes in the DNA that result in dysregulation of the protein, usually causing continuous activation of the receptor, even in the absence of growth factor). The excessive signaling that results from these genetic changes in number or activity level of the FGFR receptors contribute to abnormal cell growth and cancer. Unusual expression of the FGFR2 gene from various gene alterations has been found in some Breast cancers, Bladder cancers, Colorectal cancers, Esophageal/Gastric cancers, Endometrial cancers, Gall Bladder and Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) cancers, Glioblastomas, Head and Neck cancers, Lung cancers, Ovarian cancers, Pancreatic cancer, and Prostate cancer. Preclinical testing in cancer cell lines suggest that FGFR gene alterations can be an important mechanism of tumor progression that may be effectively targeted with FGFR inhibitors. This has led to the development of clinical trials evaluating FGFR inhibitors in FGFR genetically altered tumors, with treatment of patients in these early studies underway. FGFR is a gene that provides the code for making a protein called fibroblast growth factor receptor. This receptor is located on the surface of cells. FGFR has at least 4 subtypes, FGFR 1,2,3, and 4. When certain growth factors (proteins that stimulate cell growth and division) bind to an FGFR receptor, this activates a signaling system within the cell that causes the cell to undergo certain changes. In their normal role, the FGFR proteins play crucial roles in cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, and survival. In certain types of cancers, genetic changes in the FGFR gene have been found. These changes include either amplification (more of the receptor is made than in normal cells), translocation (the gene has moved position such that it is under different regulation, causing more of the receptor to be made than in normal cells), or mutation (changes in the DNA that result in dysregulation of the protein, usually causing continuous activation of the receptor, even in the absence of growth factor). The excessive signaling that results from these genetic changes in number or activity level of the FGFR receptors contribute to abnormal cell growth and cancer. Unusual expression of the FGFR2 gene from various gene alterations has been found in some Breast cancers, Bladder cancers, Colorectal cancers, Esophageal/Gastric cancers, Endometrial cancers, Gall Bladder and Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) cancers, Glioblastomas, Head and Neck cancers, Lung cancers, Ovarian cancers, Pancreatic cancer, and Prostate cancer. Preclinical testing in cancer cell lines suggest that FGFR gene alterations can be an important mechanism of tumor progression that may be effectively targeted with FGFR inhibitors. This has led to the development of clinical trials evaluating FGFR inhibitors in FGFR genetically altered tumors, with treatment of patients in these early studies underway.
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FGFR is a gene that provides the code for making a protein called fibroblast growth factor receptor. This receptor is located on the surface of cells. FGFR has at least 4 subtypes, FGFR 1,2,3, and 4. When certain growth factors (proteins that stimulate cell growth and division) bind to an FGFR receptor, this activates a signaling system within the cell that causes the cell to undergo certain changes. In their normal role, the FGFR proteins play crucial roles in cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, and survival.

In certain types of cancers, genetic changes in the FGFR gene have been found. These changes include either amplification (more of the receptor is made than in normal cells), translocation (the gene has moved position such that it is under different regulation, causing more of the receptor to be made than in normal cells), or mutation (changes in the DNA that result in dysregulation of the protein, usually causing continuous activation of the receptor, even in the absence of growth factor). The excessive signaling that results from these genetic changes in number or activity level of the FGFR receptors contribute to abnormal cell growth and cancer. Unusual expression of the FGFR2 gene from various gene alterations has been found in some Breast cancers, Bladder cancers, Colorectal cancers, Esophageal/Gastric cancers, Endometrial cancers, Gall Bladder and Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) cancers, Glioblastomas, Head and Neck cancers, Lung cancers, Ovarian cancers, Pancreatic cancer, and Prostate cancer.

Preclinical testing in cancer cell lines suggest that FGFR gene alterations can be an important mechanism of tumor progression that may be effectively targeted with FGFR inhibitors. This has led to the development of clinical trials evaluating FGFR inhibitors in FGFR genetically altered tumors, with treatment of patients in these early studies underway.

FGFR is a gene that provides the code for making a protein called fibroblast growth factor receptor. This receptor is located on the surface of cells. FGFR has at least 4 subtypes, FGFR 1,2,3, and 4. When certain growth factors (proteins that stimulate cell growth and division) bind to an FGFR receptor, this activates a signaling system within the cell that causes the cell to undergo certain changes. In their normal role, the FGFR proteins play crucial roles in cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, and survival.

In certain types of cancers, genetic changes in the FGFR gene have been found. These changes include either amplification (more of the receptor is made than in normal cells), translocation (the gene has moved position such that it is under different regulation, causing more of the receptor to be made than in normal cells), or mutation (changes in the DNA that result in dysregulation of the protein, usually causing continuous activation of the receptor, even in the absence of growth factor). The excessive signaling that results from these genetic changes in number or activity level of the FGFR receptors contribute to abnormal cell growth and cancer. Unusual expression of the FGFR2 gene from various gene alterations has been found in some Breast cancers, Bladder cancers, Colorectal cancers, Esophageal/Gastric cancers, Endometrial cancers, Gall Bladder and Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) cancers, Glioblastomas, Head and Neck cancers, Lung cancers, Ovarian cancers, Pancreatic cancer, and Prostate cancer.

Preclinical testing in cancer cell lines suggest that FGFR gene alterations can be an important mechanism of tumor progression that may be effectively targeted with FGFR inhibitors. This has led to the development of clinical trials evaluating FGFR inhibitors in FGFR genetically altered tumors, with treatment of patients in these early studies underway.

PubMed ID's
24265351
Expand Collapse Gene Fusion  in FGFR2
The newest generation of genotyping platforms has recently revealed the presence of FGFR2 gene fusions in a subset of cholangiocarcinoma patients. These fusions produce a novel protein in the tumor cells that leads to constant activation of FGFR2 signaling and is thought to be an essential driver of the cancer process. New FGFR family inhibitors have been developed and there is significant interest in accruing patients with FGFR2 fusion into these early-phase clinical trials.

Some FGFR2 Gene fusions previously identified in cholangiocarcinoma include FGFR2-AHCYL1; FGFR2-BICC1;
FGFR2-TACC3; FGFR2-KIAA1598; FGFR-MGEA5; RABGAP1L-NTRK1.
The newest generation of genotyping platforms has recently revealed the presence of FGFR2 gene fusions in a subset of cholangiocarcinoma patients. These fusions produce a novel protein in the tumor cells that leads to constant activation of FGFR2 signaling and is thought to be an essential driver of the cancer process. New FGFR family inhibitors have been developed and there is significant interest in accruing patients with FGFR2 fusion into these early-phase clinical trials.

Some FGFR2 Gene fusions previously identified in cholangiocarcinoma include FGFR2-AHCYL1; FGFR2-BICC1;
FGFR2-TACC3; FGFR2-KIAA1598; FGFR2-MGEA5; RABGAP1L-NTRK1.
PubMed ID's
24550739, 3958461

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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (G) - Gene, (M) - Mutation
Trial Status: No record found.
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MGH has many open clinical trials for other cancers not shown on the Targeted Cancer Care website. They can be found on the MassGeneral.org clinical trials search page.

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