Prostate Cancer

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Expand Collapse Prostate Cancer  - General Description This year about 240,000 men in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have prostate cancer. About half will be at least 67 years old. However, 10 times as many men (2.5 million) are alive today after having been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

The prostate is a walnut-sized gland located behind the rectum and under the bladder. It is the part of a man's reproductive system that produces some of the fluids that make up semen, which carries sperm out of the body. Nearly all primary prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas, which begin in cells that line certain internal organs and produce mucus or other fluids.

Prostate cancer (and other tumors) can spread (metastasize) from the place where it started (the primary tumor) in 3 ways. First, it can invade the normal tissue surrounding it. Second, cancer cells can enter the lymph system and travel through lymph vessels to distant parts of the body. Third, the cancer cells can get into the bloodstream and go to other places in the body. In these distant places, the cancer cells cause secondary tumors to grow. The main sites to which prostate cancer spreads are the bones, lungs and liver. Some patients live a long time even after prostate cancer has spread to distant sites.

To find out whether prostate cancer has entered the lymph system, a surgeon may perform a pelvic lymphadenectomy to remove the lymph nodes in the pelvis. A pathologist looks at these lymph node tissues through a microscope to see if cancer cells are present. Several kinds of imaging technologies can also be performed to determine if prostate cancer has spread. These include bone scans, MRI and CT scans.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of prostate cancers, novel therapies and treatment strategies are needed.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2012
Carcinoma of the prostate is predominantly a tumor of older men, which frequently responds to treatment when widespread and may be cured when localized. The rate of tumor growth varies from very slow to moderately rapid, and some patients may have prolonged survival even after the cancer has metastasized to distant sites such as bone. Because the median age at diagnosis is 72 years, many patients, especially those with localized tumors, may die of other illnesses without ever having suffered significant disability from the cancer. The approach to treatment is influenced by age and coexisting medical problems. Side effects of various forms of treatment should be considered in selecting appropriate management. Controversy exists in regard to the value of screening, the most appropriate staging evaluation and the optimal treatment of each stage of the disease.

A complicating feature when evaluating survival after treatment, or when comparing the various treatment strategies, is that improved diagnostic methods can increasingly identify non-lethal tumors. Non-randomized comparisons of treatments may be confounded not only by patient-selection factors, but also by time trends. For example, a population-based study in Sweden showed that from 1960 to the late 1980s, before the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for screening purposes, long-term relative survival rates after the diagnosis of prostate cancer improved substantially as more sensitive methods of diagnosis were introduced. This occurred despite the use of watchful waiting or palliative hormonal treatment as the most common treatment strategies for localized prostate cancer during the entire era (<150 radical prostatectomies per year were performed in Sweden during the late 1980s). The investigators estimated that if all cancers diagnosed between 1960 and 1964 were of the lethal variety, then at least 33% of cancers diagnosed between 1980 and 1984 were of the non-lethal variety. With the advent of PSA screening, the ability to diagnose non-lethal prostate cancers may increase further.

Another issue complicating comparisons of outcomes among non-concurrent series of patients is the possibility of changes in criteria for histologic diagnosis of prostate cancer. This phenomenon creates a statistical artifact that can produce a false sense of therapeutic accomplishment and may also lead to more aggressive therapy. For example, prostate biopsies from a population-based cohort of 1,858 men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1990 through 1992 were re-read in 2002 to 2004. The contemporary Gleason score readings were an average of 0.85 points higher (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 0.91; P<0.001) than the same slides read in 1990 to 1992. As a result, Gleason score-standardized prostate cancer mortality for these men was artifactually improved from 2.08 to 1.50 deaths per 100 person years. This resulted in a 28% decrease, even though overall outcomes were unchanged.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2012
This year about 240,000 men in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have prostate cancer. About half will be at least 67 years old. However, 10 times as many men (2.5 million) are alive today after having been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

The prostate is a walnut-sized gland located behind the rectum and under the bladder. It is the part of a man's reproductive system that produces some of the fluids that make up semen, which carries sperm out of the body. Nearly all primary prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas, which begin in cells that line certain internal organs and produce mucus or other fluids.

Prostate cancer (and other tumors) can spread (metastasize) from the place where it started (the primary tumor) in 3 ways. First, it can invade the normal tissue surrounding it. Second, cancer cells can enter the lymph system and travel through lymph vessels to distant parts of the body. Third, the cancer cells can get into the bloodstream and go to other places in the body. In these distant places, the cancer cells cause secondary tumors to grow. The main sites to which prostate cancer spreads are the bones, lungs and liver. Some patients live a long time even after prostate cancer has spread to distant sites.

To find out whether prostate cancer has entered the lymph system, a surgeon may perform a pelvic lymphadenectomy to remove the lymph nodes in the pelvis. A pathologist looks at these lymph node tissues through a microscope to see if cancer cells are present. Several kinds of imaging technologies can also be performed to determine if prostate cancer has spread. These include bone scans, MRI and CT scans.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of prostate cancers, novel therapies and treatment strategies are needed.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2012
Carcinoma of the prostate is predominantly a tumor of older men, which frequently responds to treatment when widespread and may be cured when localized. The rate of tumor growth varies from very slow to moderately rapid, and some patients may have prolonged survival even after the cancer has metastasized to distant sites such as bone. Because the median age at diagnosis is 72 years, many patients, especially those with localized tumors, may die of other illnesses without ever having suffered significant disability from the cancer. The approach to treatment is influenced by age and coexisting medical problems. Side effects of various forms of treatment should be considered in selecting appropriate management. Controversy exists in regard to the value of screening, the most appropriate staging evaluation and the optimal treatment of each stage of the disease.

A complicating feature when evaluating survival after treatment, or when comparing the various treatment strategies, is that improved diagnostic methods can increasingly identify non-lethal tumors. Non-randomized comparisons of treatments may be confounded not only by patient-selection factors, but also by time trends. For example, a population-based study in Sweden showed that from 1960 to the late 1980s, before the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for screening purposes, long-term relative survival rates after the diagnosis of prostate cancer improved substantially as more sensitive methods of diagnosis were introduced. This occurred despite the use of watchful waiting or palliative hormonal treatment as the most common treatment strategies for localized prostate cancer during the entire era (<150 radical prostatectomies per year were performed in Sweden during the late 1980s). The investigators estimated that if all cancers diagnosed between 1960 and 1964 were of the lethal variety, then at least 33% of cancers diagnosed between 1980 and 1984 were of the non-lethal variety. With the advent of PSA screening, the ability to diagnose non-lethal prostate cancers may increase further.

Another issue complicating comparisons of outcomes among non-concurrent series of patients is the possibility of changes in criteria for histologic diagnosis of prostate cancer. This phenomenon creates a statistical artifact that can produce a false sense of therapeutic accomplishment and may also lead to more aggressive therapy. For example, prostate biopsies from a population-based cohort of 1,858 men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1990 through 1992 were re-read in 2002 to 2004. The contemporary Gleason score readings were an average of 0.85 points higher (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 0.91; P<0.001) than the same slides read in 1990 to 1992. As a result, Gleason score-standardized prostate cancer mortality for these men was artifactually improved from 2.08 to 1.50 deaths per 100 person years. This resulted in a 28% decrease, even though overall outcomes were unchanged.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2012
Expand Collapse No gene selected  - General Description
Cancer research and treatments are constantly changing. Knowing the gene associated with your cancer can help doctors determine the most appropriate direction of care for you. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.

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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease
Trial Status: Showing all 6 results Per Page:
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT01524978 A Study of Zelboraf (Vemurafenib) in Patients With BRAF V600 Mutation-Positive Cancers A Study of Zelboraf (Vemurafenib) in Patients With BRAF V600 Mutation-Positive Cancers MGH Open D
NCT02219711 Phase 1/1b Study of MGCD516 in Patients With Advanced Cancer Phase 1/1b Study of MGCD516 in Patients With Advanced Cancer MGH Open D
NCT01631552 Phase I/II Study of IMMU-132 in Patients With Epithelial Cancers Phase I/II Study of IMMU-132 in Patients With Epithelial Cancers MGH Open D
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NCT02189174 Study of CLR457 Administered Orally in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies Study of CLR457 Administered Orally in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies MGH Open D
NCT02073994 Study of Orally Administered AG-120 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors, Including Glioma, With an IDH1 Mutation Study of Orally Administered AG-120 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors, Including Glioma, With an IDH1 Mutation MGH Open D
MGH has many open clinical trials for other cancers not shown on the Targeted Cancer Care website. They can be found on the MassGeneral.org clinical trials search page.

Additional clinical trials may be applicable to your search criteria, but they may not be available at MGH. These clinical trials can typically be found by searching the clinicaltrials.gov website.
Trial Status: Showing all 6 results Per Page:

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