Melanoma, PTEN, R173C (c.517C>T)

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Expand Collapse Melanoma  - General Description Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

PubMed ID's
21343559, 22798288, 20551065
Expand Collapse PTEN  - General Description
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PTEN is a gene that provides the code for making a protein called phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Found in almost all tissues in the body, this protein acts as a tumor suppressor. That is, it keeps cells from growing and dividing too fast or in an uncontrolled way. The PTEN protein is part of a signaling pathway that tells cells to stop dividing and triggers their self-destruction (apoptosis). It also may help control how cells move (migration), stick to other cells (adhesion) and protect their genetic information.

Somatic mutations in PTEN are among the most common genetic changes found in human cancers. Instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), somatic mutations are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous. PTEN may be the most frequently mutated gene in prostate cancer and endometrial cancer. These mutations usually result in a defective protein that has lost its ability to be a tumor suppressor. Such mutations also are found in certain brain tumors (glioblastomas and astrocytomas) and melanoma of the skin. Loss of PTEN expression is also a common way by which PTEN activity can be reduced and the PI3K pathway can be activated.

Several related conditions caused by inherited mutations in PTEN are grouped together as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome. One of these conditions is Cowden syndrome, which is characterized by the growth of many hamartomas and an increased risk of developing breast, thyroid or endometrial cancer. Mutations that cause Cowden syndrome lead to production of a defective PTEN protein that cannot stop cell division or trigger apoptosis, which contributes to the development of hamartomas and cancerous tumors.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
The PTEN gene encodes a lipid phosphatase that antagonizes oncogenic PI3K/AKT signaling via dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) at the cell membrane. Cancer-associated genomic alterations in PTEN result in PTEN inactivation and thus increased activity of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Somatic mutations of PTEN occur in multiple malignancies, including gliomas, melanoma, prostate, endometrial, breast, ovarian, renal and lung cancers. Germline PTEN mutations are associated with inherited hamartoma syndromes, including Cowden syndrome. Loss of PTEN expression is also a common way by which PTEN activity can be reduced and the PI3K pathway can be activated.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
Expand Collapse R173C (c.517C>T)  in PTEN
The PTEN R173C mutation arises from a single nucleotide change (c.517C>T) and results in an amino acid substitution of the arginine (R) at position 173 by a cysteine (C).
The PTEN R173C mutation arises from a single nucleotide change (c.517C>T) and results in an amino acid substitution of the arginine (R) at position 173 by a cysteine (C).

PTEN somatic mutations are seen in melanomas harboring BRAF mutations, but not NRAS mutations.

Loss of PTEN expression has been identified in approximately 20% of melanomas. Deletion of the PTEN gene has been associated with resistance to treatment with BRAF inhibitors (such as vemurafenib) in melanoma cell lines that harbor a BRAF mutation. In other preclinical laboratory models, either PI3K, AKT or mTOR inhibitors administered together with a BRAF or MEK inhibitor appears to overcome this drug resistance. Inhibitors of the PI3-kinase subunit p110 beta appear particularly well-suited to tumors with PTEN deletion and are currently being investigated in patients with PTEN deleted melanomas.

PTEN somatic mutations are seen in melanomas harboring BRAF mutations, but not NRAS mutations.

Loss of PTEN expression has been identified in approximately 20% of melanomas. Deletion of the PTEN gene has been associated with resistance to treatment with BRAF inhibitors (such as vemurafenib) in melanoma cell lines that harbor a BRAF mutation. In other preclinical laboratory models, either PI3K, AKT or mTOR inhibitors administered together with a BRAF or MEK inhibitor appears to overcome this drug resistance. Inhibitors of the PI3-kinase subunit p110 beta appear particularly well-suited to tumors with PTEN deletion and are currently being investigated in patients with PTEN deleted melanomas.

PubMed ID's
15009714
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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease, (G) - Gene, (M) - Mutation
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 23 Per Page:
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Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02637531 A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of IPI-549 A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of IPI-549 MGH Open D
NCT01656642 A Phase 1b Study of Atezolizumab in Combination With Vemurafenib or Vemurafenib Plus Cobimetinib in Participants With BRAFV600-Mutation Positive Metastatic Melanoma A Phase 1b Study of Atezolizumab in Combination With Vemurafenib or Vemurafenib Plus Cobimetinib in Participants With BRAFV600-Mutation Positive Metastatic Melanoma MGH Open D
NCT02327169 A Phase 1B Study of MLN2480 in Combination With MLN0128 or Alisertib, or Paclitaxel, or Cetuximab, or Irinotecan in Adult Patients With Advanced Nonhematologic Malignancies A Phase 1B Study of MLN2480 in Combination With MLN0128 or Alisertib, or Paclitaxel, or Cetuximab, or Irinotecan in Adult Patients With Advanced Nonhematologic Malignancies MGH Open D
NCT02110355 A Phase 1b/2a Study Evaluating AMG 232 in Metastatic Melanoma A Phase 1b/2a Study Evaluating AMG 232 in Metastatic Melanoma MGH Open D
NCT02752074 A Phase 3 Study of Pembrolizumab + Epacadostat or Placebo in Subjects With Unresectable or Metastatic Melanoma A Phase 3 Study of Pembrolizumab + Epacadostat or Placebo in Subjects With Unresectable or Metastatic Melanoma MGH Open D
NCT02219724 A Phase I, Open-Label Study of MOXR0916 in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors A Phase I, Open-Label Study of MOXR0916 in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01714739 A Study of an Anti-KIR Antibody in Combination With an Anti-PD1 Antibody in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Study of an Anti-KIR Antibody in Combination With an Anti-PD1 Antibody in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01325441 A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies MGH Open D
NCT02228811 A Study of DCC-2701 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors A Study of DCC-2701 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02082210 A Study of LY2875358 in Combination With Ramucirumab (LY3009806) in Participants With Advanced Cancer A Study of LY2875358 in Combination With Ramucirumab (LY3009806) in Participants With Advanced Cancer MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 23 Per Page:
123Next »
Our Melanoma Team

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