Melanoma, Beta-Catenin (CTNNB1)

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Expand Collapse Melanoma  - General Description Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

PubMed ID's
21343559, 22798288, 20551065
Expand Collapse Beta-Catenin (CTNNB1)  - General Description
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The CTNNB1 gene encodes a protein called beta-catenin that has several important functions in the cell. These include being involved in cell to cell contacts at adherens junctions, and being involved in the WNT signaling pathway.

The first role beta-catenin is integral to is in participating in cell to cell contacts. Where cells are in contact with one another, beta catenin is part of a complex of proteins that form what are called adherens junctions. Adherens junctions are protein complexes that occur at cell-to-cell junctions and are essential for the formation and maintenance of epithelial cell layers. In this role, beta-catenin functions to anchor the actin cytoskeleton of cells, and to transmit the contact inhibition signal that causes cells to stop dividing once the epithelial layer of cells is complete. Beta catenin also has a role in cell migration.

In a second role, beta-catenin is involved in the Wnt signaling pathway (see graphic above). In the absence of a Wnt signal, beta catenin is normally kept at very low levels within the cell by a destruction complex. This destruction complex includes proteins called GSK-3, APC, and axin, and is responsible for degrading beta catenin. When a Wnt ligand binds to a Wnt receptor on the cell surface, this triggers a signal in the cell that causes the dissociation of the destruction complex, and beta catenin is no longer degraded. Instead, it builds up in the cytoplasm of the cell, and binds to T cell factor (TCF). Beta catenin/TCF translocate into the nucleus, and bind to Wnt target genes that promote growth, including C-Myc and Cyclin D1.

Mutations in the CTNNB1 gene that encodes the beta catenin protein result in the abnormal accumulation of the beta catenin protein in the cell. These and are frequently found in some cancers including colorectal cancer, endometrial and uterine cancers, as well as medulloblastomas. Mutations in CTNNB1/the beta catenin protein also occur in adenocarcinoma of the lung and colorectal cancers, and less frequently in liver cancer, gastric adenocarcinoma, bladder cancer, desmoid tumors, and pilomatrixoma.

Source: TumorPortal.org
The CTNNB1 gene encodes a protein called beta-catenin that has several important functions in the cell. These include being involved in cell to cell contacts at adherens junctions, and being involved in the WNT signaling pathway.

The first role beta-catenin is integral to is in participating in cell to cell contacts. Where cells are in contact with one another, beta catenin is part of a complex of proteins that form what are called adherens junctions. Adherens junctions are protein complexes that occur at cell-to-cell junctions and are essential for the formation and maintenance of epithelial cell layers. In this role, beta-catenin functions to anchor the actin cytoskeleton of cells, and to transmit the contact inhibition signal that causes cells to stop dividing once the epithelial layer of cells is complete. Beta catenin also has a role in cell migration.

In a second role, beta-catenin is involved in the Wnt signaling pathway (see graphic above). In the absence of a Wnt signal, beta catenin is normally kept at very low levels within the cell by a destruction complex. This destruction complex includes proteins called GSK-3, APC, and axin, and is responsible for degrading beta catenin. When a Wnt ligand binds to a Wnt receptor on the cell surface, this triggers a signal in the cell that causes the dissociation of the destruction complex, and beta catenin is no longer degraded. Instead, it builds up in the cytoplasm of the cell, and binds to T cell factor (TCF). Beta catenin/TCF translocate into the nucleus, and bind to Wnt target genes that promote growth, including C-Myc and Cyclin D1.

Mutations in the CTNNB1 gene that encodes the beta catenin protein result in the abnormal accumulation of the beta catenin protein in the cell. These and are frequently found in some cancers including colorectal cancer, endometrial and uterine cancers, as well as medulloblastomas. Mutations in CTNNB1/the beta catenin protein also occur in adenocarcinoma of the lung and colorectal cancers, and less frequently in liver cancer, gastric adenocarcinoma, bladder cancer, desmoid tumors, and pilomatrixoma.

Source: TumorPortal.org
PubMed ID's
19619488, 22682243
Expand Collapse Beta-Catenin (CTNNB1)  in Melanoma
Mutations in CTNNB1 (those occurring in exon 3) render beta-catenin resistant to degradation and result in its cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation. The prognostic relevance of CTNNB1 mutations has not been determined and the actual role of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in melanoma is controversial. However, emerging evidence suggests that increased levels of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear beta-catenin are linked to a good prognosis and increased overall survival of melanoma patients.

Mutations in CTNNB1 (those occurring in exon 3) render beta-catenin resistant to degradation and result in its cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation. The prognostic relevance of CTNNB1 mutations has not been determined and the actual role of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in melanoma is controversial. However, emerging evidence suggests that increased levels of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear beta-catenin are linked to a good prognosis and increased overall survival of melanoma patients.

PubMed ID's
9065403, 11351304, 20603725, 12960126, 16361544, 19144919, 19884546
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.
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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease, (G) - Gene
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 30 Per Page:
123Next »
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02335918 A Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of Anti-CD27 (Varlilumab) and Anti-PD-1 (Nivolumab) in Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors A Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of Anti-CD27 (Varlilumab) and Anti-PD-1 (Nivolumab) in Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02637531 A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of IPI-549 A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of IPI-549 MGH Open D
NCT02327169 A Phase 1B Study of MLN2480 in Combination With MLN0128 or Alisertib, or Paclitaxel, or Cetuximab, or Irinotecan in Adult Patients With Advanced Nonhematologic Malignancies A Phase 1B Study of MLN2480 in Combination With MLN0128 or Alisertib, or Paclitaxel, or Cetuximab, or Irinotecan in Adult Patients With Advanced Nonhematologic Malignancies MGH Open D
NCT02110355 A Phase 1b/2a Study Evaluating AMG 232 in Metastatic Melanoma A Phase 1b/2a Study Evaluating AMG 232 in Metastatic Melanoma MGH Open D
NCT01714739 A Study of an Anti-KIR Antibody in Combination With an Anti-PD1 Antibody in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Study of an Anti-KIR Antibody in Combination With an Anti-PD1 Antibody in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01325441 A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies MGH Open D
NCT02228811 A Study of DCC-2701 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors A Study of DCC-2701 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02082210 A Study of LY2875358 in Combination With Ramucirumab (LY3009806) in Participants With Advanced Cancer A Study of LY2875358 in Combination With Ramucirumab (LY3009806) in Participants With Advanced Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02857270 A Study of LY3214996 Administered Alone or in Combination With Other Agents in Participants With Advanced/Metastatic Cancer A Study of LY3214996 Administered Alone or in Combination With Other Agents in Participants With Advanced/Metastatic Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02320058 A Study to Evaluate Safety and Effectiveness in Patients With Melanoma That Has Spread to the Brain Treated With Nivolumab in Combination With Ipilimumab Followed by Nivolumab by Itself A Study to Evaluate Safety and Effectiveness in Patients With Melanoma That Has Spread to the Brain Treated With Nivolumab in Combination With Ipilimumab Followed by Nivolumab by Itself MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 30 Per Page:
123Next »
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