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Melanoma

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Expand Collapse Melanoma  - General Description Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. Prognosis is generally good and both of these cancer types can usually be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently activated by mutation in this malignancy and the common BRAF V600E and V600K mutations have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course and shorter survival. Vemurafenib is a new and effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma based on the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. Preclinical data has indicated that the rare BRAF V600R mutation may also be sensitive to vemurafenib. Also, the BRAF L597R mutation has been found to confer sensitivity to downstream MEK inhibitors. Most recently, the combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in cancer genes such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, PIK3CA and KIT may provide opportunities for enrollment into ongoing clinical trials.

PubMed ID's
21343559, 22798288, 20551065
Expand Collapse No gene selected  - General Description
Cancer research and treatments are constantly changing. Knowing the gene associated with your cancer can help doctors determine the most appropriate direction of care for you. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.

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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 23 Per Page:
123Next »
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT01375842 A Phase 1 Study of Atezolizumab (an Engineered Anti-PDL1 Antibody) in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors A Phase 1 Study of Atezolizumab (an Engineered Anti-PDL1 Antibody) in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01656642 A Phase 1b Study of Atezolizumab in Combination With Vemurafenib or Vemurafenib Plus Cobimetinib in Participants With BRAFV600-Mutation Positive Metastatic Melanoma A Phase 1b Study of Atezolizumab in Combination With Vemurafenib or Vemurafenib Plus Cobimetinib in Participants With BRAFV600-Mutation Positive Metastatic Melanoma MGH Open D
NCT02327169 A Phase 1B Study of MLN2480 in Combination With MLN0128 or Alisertib, or Paclitaxel, or Cetuximab, or Irinotecan in Adult Patients With Advanced Nonhematologic Malignancies A Phase 1B Study of MLN2480 in Combination With MLN0128 or Alisertib, or Paclitaxel, or Cetuximab, or Irinotecan in Adult Patients With Advanced Nonhematologic Malignancies MGH Open D
NCT02110355 A Phase 1b/2a Study Evaluating AMG 232 in Metastatic Melanoma A Phase 1b/2a Study Evaluating AMG 232 in Metastatic Melanoma MGH Open D
NCT02219724 A Phase I, Open-Label Study of MOXR0916 in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors A Phase I, Open-Label Study of MOXR0916 in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01714739 A Study of an Anti-KIR Antibody in Combination With an Anti-PD1 Antibody in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Study of an Anti-KIR Antibody in Combination With an Anti-PD1 Antibody in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01325441 A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies MGH Open D
NCT02228811 A Study of DCC-2701 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors A Study of DCC-2701 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02082210 A Study of LY2875358 in Combination With Ramucirumab (LY3009806) in Participants With Advanced Cancer A Study of LY2875358 in Combination With Ramucirumab (LY3009806) in Participants With Advanced Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02014116 A Study of LY3009120 in Participants With Advanced Cancer or Cancer That Has Spread to Other Parts of Their Body A Study of LY3009120 in Participants With Advanced Cancer or Cancer That Has Spread to Other Parts of Their Body MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 23 Per Page:
123Next »

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