Breast Cancer, ERBB2 (HER2)

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Expand Collapse Breast Cancer  - General Description Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer. In addition, mutation carriers may be at increased risk of other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should first be referred for counseling. Breast cancer is commonly treated by various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.

Over the past years, significant major strides in understanding the biology of breast cancer have translated into actionable targeted therapies. For metastatic hormone receptor positive breast cancer, FDA approved therapies include tamoxifen, a selective estrogen modulator, aromatase inhibitors including exemestane, letrozole, and anastrozole, fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor blocker, and more recently everoliumus, a mTOR inhibitor, in combination with exemestane.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, novel therapies and treatment strategies are needed. There are a number of novel therapies in development tailored to specific somatic mutations in the tumor.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer. In addition, mutation carriers may be at increased risk of other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should first be referred for counseling. Breast cancer is commonly treated by various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.

Over the past years, significant major strides in understanding the biology of breast cancer have translated into actionable targeted therapies. For metastatic hormone receptor positive breast cancer, FDA approved therapies include tamoxifen, a selective estrogen modulator, aromatase inhibitors including exemestane, letrozole, and anastrozole, fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor blocker, and more recently everoliumus, a mTOR inhibitor, in combination with exemestane.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, novel therapies and treatment strategies are needed. There are a number of novel therapies in development tailored to specific somatic mutations in the tumor.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer. In addition, mutation carriers may be at increased risk of other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should first be referred for counseling. Breast cancer is commonly treated by various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.

Over the past years, significant major strides in understanding the biology of breast cancer have translated into actionable targeted therapies. For metastatic hormone receptor positive breast cancer, FDA approved therapies include tamoxifen, a selective estrogen modulator, aromatase inhibitors including exemestane, letrozole, and anastrozole, fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor blocker, and more recently everoliumus, a mTOR inhibitor, in combination with exemestane.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, novel therapies and treatment strategies are needed. There are a number of novel therapies in development tailored to specific somatic mutations in the tumor.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer. In addition, mutation carriers may be at increased risk of other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should first be referred for counseling. Breast cancer is commonly treated by various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.

Over the past years, significant major strides in understanding the biology of breast cancer have translated into actionable targeted therapies. For metastatic hormone receptor positive breast cancer, FDA approved therapies include tamoxifen, a selective estrogen modulator, aromatase inhibitors including exemestane, letrozole, and anastrozole, fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor blocker, and more recently everoliumus, a mTOR inhibitor, in combination with exemestane.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, novel therapies and treatment strategies are needed. There are a number of novel therapies in development tailored to specific somatic mutations in the tumor.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Expand Collapse ERBB2 (HER2)  - General Description
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Erbb2, often called HER2, is a gene that provides the code for making a cell surface growth receptor called the ErbB2 (HER2). When certain growth factors (proteins that stimulate cell growth and division) bind to this receptor, they activate a signaling system inside the cell that ultimately promotes diverse functions such as growth, interaction and adhesion between cells, and ability of the cell to migrate within tissues. In some tumors, the activation of HER2 signaling is an important mechanism that drives the disease process. This can occur through HER2 gene amplification (the most common mechanism) or HER2 gene mutation in cancer cells.

Extra copies of the HER2 gene (gene amplification) have been found in a number of different cancers. This causes the cancer cells to make excess HER2 (overexpression), which in turn, tells the cells to grow and divide in an uncontrolled manner. The presence of amplified HER2 has been reported in breast tumors, esophageal tumors, gastric cancers, ovarian tumors and bladder cancer. Genetic mutations (changes in the DNA sequence that codes the ERBB2 (HER2)protein have also been found in certain tumors.

Testing for genetic alterations in ERBB2 (HER2) can be performed at the MGH, or other large academic centers. Treatment and Clinical Trials testing new therapies are also available at MGH Cancer Center.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
Erbb2, often called HER2, is a gene that provides the code for making a cell surface growth receptor called the ErbB2 (HER2). When certain growth factors (proteins that stimulate cell growth and division) bind to this receptor, they activate a signaling system inside the cell that ultimately promotes diverse functions such as growth, interaction and adhesion between cells, and ability of the cell to migrate within tissues. In some tumors, the activation of HER2 signaling is an important mechanism that drives the disease process. This can occur through HER2 gene amplification (the most common mechanism) or HER2 gene mutation in cancer cells.

Extra copies of the HER2 gene (gene amplification) have been found in a number of different cancers. This causes the cancer cells to make excess HER2 (overexpression), which in turn, tells the cells to grow and divide in an uncontrolled manner. The presence of amplified HER2 has been reported in breast tumors, esophageal tumors, gastric cancers, ovarian tumors and bladder cancer. Genetic mutations (changes in the DNA sequence that codes the ERBB2 (HER2)protein have also been found in certain tumors.

Testing for genetic alterations in ERBB2 (HER2) can be performed at the MGH, or other large academic centers. Treatment and Clinical Trials testing new therapies are also available at MGH Cancer Center.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
PubMed ID's
15864276, 9130710, 15457249, 16397024, 18772890, 16843263, 16988931, 22899400
Expand Collapse ERBB2 (HER2)  in Breast Cancer
HER2 overexpression, including overexpression caused by gene amplification, is a validated therapeutic target in breast cancer, with multiple matched therapies already in clinical use. In addition to those therapeutic agents approved for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer, clinical trials are now underway to study novel treatment strategies designed to prevent the acquired resistance that occurs in some patients.


HER2 overexpression, including overexpression caused by gene amplification, is a validated therapeutic target in breast cancer, with multiple matched therapies already in clinical use. In addition to those therapeutic agents approved for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer, clinical trials are now underway to study novel treatment strategies designed to prevent the acquired resistance that occurs in some patients.



PubMed ID's
16843263
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.
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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease, (G) - Gene
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 53 Per Page:
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Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT01953926 An Open-label, Phase 2 Study of Neratinib in Patients With Solid Tumors With Somatic Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR, HER2, HER3) Mutations or EGFR Gene Amplification An Open-label, Phase 2 Study of Neratinib in Patients With Solid Tumors With Somatic Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR, HER2, HER3) Mutations or EGFR Gene Amplification MGH Open DG
NCT02657343 An Open-Label, Phase Ib/II Clinical Trial Of Cdk 4/6 Inhibitor, Ribociclib (Lee011), In Combination With Trastuzumab Or T-Dm1 For Advanced/Metastatic Her2-Positive Breast Cancer. An Open-Label, Phase Ib/II Clinical Trial Of Cdk 4/6 Inhibitor, Ribociclib (Lee011), In Combination With Trastuzumab Or T-Dm1 For Advanced/Metastatic Her2-Positive Breast Cancer. MGH Open DG
NCT02580448 CYP17 Lyase and Androgen Receptor Inhibitor Treatment With Seviteronel Trial (INO-VT-464-006; NCT02580448) CYP17 Lyase and Androgen Receptor Inhibitor Treatment With Seviteronel Trial (INO-VT-464-006; NCT02580448) MGH Open DG
NCT02500199 Phase I Study of Pyrotinib in Patients With HER2-positive Solid Tumors Phase I Study of Pyrotinib in Patients With HER2-positive Solid Tumors MGH Open DG
NCT02952729 Study of Antibody Drug Conjugate in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer Expressing HER2 Study of Antibody Drug Conjugate in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer Expressing HER2 MGH Open DG
NCT02326974 T-DM1+Pertuzumab in Pre-OP Early-Stage HER2+ BRCA T-DM1+Pertuzumab in Pre-OP Early-Stage HER2+ BRCA MGH Open DG
NCT03250676 Trial of H3B-6545, a Covalent Antagonist of Estrogen Receptor Alpha, in Women With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Estrogen Receptor-positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer Trial of H3B-6545, a Covalent Antagonist of Estrogen Receptor Alpha, in Women With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Estrogen Receptor-positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer MGH Open DG
NCT01296555 A Dose Escalation Study Evaluating the Safety and Tolerability of GDC-0032 in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) and in Combination With Endocrine Therapy in Locally Advanced or Metastatic Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer A Dose Escalation Study Evaluating the Safety and Tolerability of GDC-0032 in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) and in Combination With Endocrine Therapy in Locally Advanced or Metastatic Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02052778 A Dose Finding Study Followed by a Safety and Efficacy Study in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Multiple Myeloma With FGF/FGFR-Related Abnormalities A Dose Finding Study Followed by a Safety and Efficacy Study in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Multiple Myeloma With FGF/FGFR-Related Abnormalities MGH Open D
NCT02715284 A Phase 1 Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of TSR-042, an Anti-PD-1 Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Phase 1 Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of TSR-042, an Anti-PD-1 Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 53 Per Page:
123456Next »
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