Breast Cancer

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Expand Collapse Breast Cancer  - General Description Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer. In addition, mutation carriers may be at increased risk of other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should first be referred for counseling. Breast cancer is commonly treated by various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.

Over the past years, significant major strides in understanding the biology of breast cancer have translated into actionable targeted therapies. For metastatic hormone receptor positive breast cancer, FDA approved therapies include tamoxifen, a selective estrogen modulator, aromatase inhibitors including exemestane, letrozole, and anastrozole, fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor blocker, and more recently everoliumus, a mTOR inhibitor, in combination with exemestane.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, novel therapies and treatment strategies are needed. There are a number of novel therapies in development tailored to specific somatic mutations in the tumor.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer. In addition, mutation carriers may be at increased risk of other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should first be referred for counseling. Breast cancer is commonly treated by various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.

Over the past years, significant major strides in understanding the biology of breast cancer have translated into actionable targeted therapies. For metastatic hormone receptor positive breast cancer, FDA approved therapies include tamoxifen, a selective estrogen modulator, aromatase inhibitors including exemestane, letrozole, and anastrozole, fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor blocker, and more recently everoliumus, a mTOR inhibitor, in combination with exemestane.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, novel therapies and treatment strategies are needed. There are a number of novel therapies in development tailored to specific somatic mutations in the tumor.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer. In addition, mutation carriers may be at increased risk of other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should first be referred for counseling. Breast cancer is commonly treated by various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.

Over the past years, significant major strides in understanding the biology of breast cancer have translated into actionable targeted therapies. For metastatic hormone receptor positive breast cancer, FDA approved therapies include tamoxifen, a selective estrogen modulator, aromatase inhibitors including exemestane, letrozole, and anastrozole, fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor blocker, and more recently everoliumus, a mTOR inhibitor, in combination with exemestane.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, novel therapies and treatment strategies are needed. There are a number of novel therapies in development tailored to specific somatic mutations in the tumor.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer. In addition, mutation carriers may be at increased risk of other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should first be referred for counseling. Breast cancer is commonly treated by various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.

Over the past years, significant major strides in understanding the biology of breast cancer have translated into actionable targeted therapies. For metastatic hormone receptor positive breast cancer, FDA approved therapies include tamoxifen, a selective estrogen modulator, aromatase inhibitors including exemestane, letrozole, and anastrozole, fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor blocker, and more recently everoliumus, a mTOR inhibitor, in combination with exemestane.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, novel therapies and treatment strategies are needed. There are a number of novel therapies in development tailored to specific somatic mutations in the tumor.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Expand Collapse No gene selected  - General Description
Cancer research and treatments are constantly changing. Knowing the gene associated with your cancer can help doctors determine the most appropriate direction of care for you. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.

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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 42 Per Page:
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Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT01296555 A Dose Escalation Study Evaluating the Safety and Tolerability of GDC-0032 in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) and in Combination With Endocrine Therapy in Locally Advanced or Metastatic Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer A Dose Escalation Study Evaluating the Safety and Tolerability of GDC-0032 in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) and in Combination With Endocrine Therapy in Locally Advanced or Metastatic Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02052778 A Dose Finding Study Followed by a Safety and Efficacy Study in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Multiple Myeloma With FGF/FGFR-Related Abnormalities A Dose Finding Study Followed by a Safety and Efficacy Study in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Multiple Myeloma With FGF/FGFR-Related Abnormalities MGH Open D
NCT02580448 A Open-Label Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Efficacy of VT-464 in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer A Open-Label Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Efficacy of VT-464 in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02715284 A Phase 1 Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of TSR-042, an Anti-PD-1 Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Phase 1 Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of TSR-042, an Anti-PD-1 Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02099058 A Phase 1/1b Study With ABBV-399, an Antibody Drug Conjugate, in Subjects With Advanced Solid Cancer Tumors A Phase 1/1b Study With ABBV-399, an Antibody Drug Conjugate, in Subjects With Advanced Solid Cancer Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02338349 A Phase I, Multicenter, Open-Label, Two-Part, Dose-escalation Study of RAD1901 in Postmenopausal Women With Advanced Estrogen Receptor Positive and HER2-Negative Breast Cancer A Phase I, Multicenter, Open-Label, Two-Part, Dose-escalation Study of RAD1901 in Postmenopausal Women With Advanced Estrogen Receptor Positive and HER2-Negative Breast Cancer MGH Open D
NCT01525589 A Phase II Clinical Trial of PM01183 in BRCA 1/2-Associated or Unselected Metastatic Breast Cancer A Phase II Clinical Trial of PM01183 in BRCA 1/2-Associated or Unselected Metastatic Breast Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02467361 A Study of BBI608 Administered in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Adult Patients With Advanced Cancers A Study of BBI608 Administered in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Adult Patients With Advanced Cancers MGH Open D
NCT01325441 A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies MGH Open D
NCT02471846 A Study of GDC-0919 and Atezolizumab Combination Treatment in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors A Study of GDC-0919 and Atezolizumab Combination Treatment in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 42 Per Page:
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