Brain Tumors, PIK3CA, E545A (c.1634A>C)

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Expand Collapse Brain Tumors  - General Description Data summarized by the CBTRUS (the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States) Statistical Report: Primary Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors diagnosed in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012 was analyzed and published in 2015. It includes malignant and non-malignant tumors in brain, meninges, spinal cord, cranial nerves, and other parts of the central nervous system, pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity. In the 2015 published report, the final number of all newly diagnosed tumors including all of the above was 356,858 in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012. The most commonly diagnosed CNS tumors are meningiomas (36.4% for this time period), followed by tumors of the pituitary (15.5% for this time period). Gliomas are tumors that arise from glial or precursor cells in the CNS, and include glioblastoma (15.1% for this time period), astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, ependymoma, mixed glioma and malignant glioma, and a few other rare histologies. Of the 356,858 tumors included in the CBTRUS 2015 analysis, 239,835 (67.2%) were non-malignant tumors, while 117,023 of the CNS tumors for this time period were malignant.
Few definitive observations on environmental or occupational causes of primary Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors have been made. The following risk factors have been considered: Exposure to vinyl chloride may be a risk factor for glioma. Radiation exposure is a risk factor for meningioma. Epstein-Barr virus infection has been implicated in the etiology of primary CNS lymphoma. Transplant recipients and patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome have substantially increased risks for primary CNS lymphoma.
Familial tumor syndromes and related chromosomal abnormalities that are associated with CNS neoplasms include the following: Neurofibromatosis type I (17q11), neurofibromatosis type II (22q12), von Hippel-Lindau disease (3p25-26), tuberous sclerosis complex (9q34, 16p13), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (17p13), Turcot syndrome type 1 (3p21, 7p22), Turcot syndrome type 2 (5q21), nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (9q22.3) and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (11q13).

Sources: National Cancer Institute, 2016
CBTRUS Statistical Report: Primary Brain and CNS Tumors Diagnosed in the US in 2008-2012; Neuro Oncol; 2015


Data summarized by the CBTRUS (the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States) Statistical Report: Primary Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors diagnosed in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012 was analyzed and published in 2015. It includes malignant and non-malignant tumors in brain, meninges, spinal cord, cranial nerves, and other parts of the central nervous system, pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity. In the 2015 published report, the final number of all newly diagnosed tumors including all of the above was 356,858 in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012. The most commonly diagnosed CNS tumors are meningiomas (36.4% for this time period), followed by tumors of the pituitary (15.5% for this time period). Gliomas are tumors that arise from glial or precursor cells in the CNS, and include glioblastoma (15.1% for this time period), astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, ependymoma, mixed glioma and malignant glioma, and a few other rare histologies. Of the 356,858 tumors included in the CBTRUS 2015 analysis, 239,835 (67.2%) were non-malignant tumors, while 117,023 of the CNS tumors for this time period were malignant.
Few definitive observations on environmental or occupational causes of primary Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors have been made. The following risk factors have been considered: Exposure to vinyl chloride may be a risk factor for glioma. Radiation exposure is a risk factor for meningioma. Epstein-Barr virus infection has been implicated in the etiology of primary CNS lymphoma. Transplant recipients and patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome have substantially increased risks for primary CNS lymphoma.
Familial tumor syndromes and related chromosomal abnormalities that are associated with CNS neoplasms include the following: Neurofibromatosis type I (17q11), neurofibromatosis type II (22q12), von Hippel-Lindau disease (3p25-26), tuberous sclerosis complex (9q34, 16p13), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (17p13), Turcot syndrome type 1 (3p21, 7p22), Turcot syndrome type 2 (5q21), nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (9q22.3) and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (11q13).

Sources: National Cancer Institute, 2016
CBTRUS Statistical Report: Primary Brain and CNS Tumors Diagnosed in the US in 2008-2012; Neuro Oncol; 2015


Data summarized by the CBTRUS (the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States) Statistical Report: Primary Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors diagnosed in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012 was analyzed and published in 2015. It includes malignant and non-malignant tumors in brain, meninges, spinal cord, cranial nerves, and other parts of the central nervous system, pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity. In the 2015 published report, the final number of all newly diagnosed tumors including all of the above was 356,858 in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012. The most commonly diagnosed CNS tumors are meningiomas (36.4% for this time period), followed by tumors of the pituitary (15.5% for this time period). Gliomas are tumors that arise from glial or precursor cells in the CNS, and include glioblastoma (15.1% for this time period), astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, ependymoma, mixed glioma and malignant glioma, and a few other rare histologies. Of the 356,858 tumors included in the CBTRUS 2015 analysis, 239,835 (67.2%) were non-malignant tumors, while 117,023 of the CNS tumors for this time period were malignant.
Few definitive observations on environmental or occupational causes of primary Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors have been made. The following risk factors have been considered: Exposure to vinyl chloride may be a risk factor for glioma. Radiation exposure is a risk factor for meningioma. Epstein-Barr virus infection has been implicated in the etiology of primary CNS lymphoma. Transplant recipients and patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome have substantially increased risks for primary CNS lymphoma.
Familial tumor syndromes and related chromosomal abnormalities that are associated with CNS neoplasms include the following: Neurofibromatosis type I (17q11), neurofibromatosis type II (22q12), von Hippel-Lindau disease (3p25-26), tuberous sclerosis complex (9q34, 16p13), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (17p13), Turcot syndrome type 1 (3p21, 7p22), Turcot syndrome type 2 (5q21), nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (9q22.3) and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (11q13).

Sources: National Cancer Institute, 2016
CBTRUS Statistical Report: Primary Brain and CNS Tumors Diagnosed in the US in 2008-2012; Neuro Oncol; 2015


Data summarized by the CBTRUS (the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States) Statistical Report: Primary Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors diagnosed in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012 was analyzed and published in 2015. It includes malignant and non-malignant tumors in brain, meninges, spinal cord, cranial nerves, and other parts of the central nervous system, pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity. In the 2015 published report, the final number of all newly diagnosed tumors including all of the above was 356,858 in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012. The most commonly diagnosed CNS tumors are meningiomas (36.4% for this time period), followed by tumors of the pituitary (15.5% for this time period). Gliomas are tumors that arise from glial or precursor cells in the CNS, and include glioblastoma (15.1% for this time period), astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, ependymoma, mixed glioma and malignant glioma, and a few other rare histologies. Of the 356,858 tumors included in the CBTRUS 2015 analysis, 239,835 (67.2%) were non-malignant tumors, while 117,023 of the CNS tumors for this time period were malignant.
Few definitive observations on environmental or occupational causes of primary Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors have been made. The following risk factors have been considered: Exposure to vinyl chloride may be a risk factor for glioma. Radiation exposure is a risk factor for meningioma. Epstein-Barr virus infection has been implicated in the etiology of primary CNS lymphoma. Transplant recipients and patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome have substantially increased risks for primary CNS lymphoma.
Familial tumor syndromes and related chromosomal abnormalities that are associated with CNS neoplasms include the following: Neurofibromatosis type I (17q11), neurofibromatosis type II (22q12), von Hippel-Lindau disease (3p25-26), tuberous sclerosis complex (9q34, 16p13), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (17p13), Turcot syndrome type 1 (3p21, 7p22), Turcot syndrome type 2 (5q21), nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (9q22.3) and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (11q13).

Sources: National Cancer Institute, 2016
CBTRUS Statistical Report: Primary Brain and CNS Tumors Diagnosed in the US in 2008-2012; Neuro Oncol; 2015


Expand Collapse PIK3CA  - General Description
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PIK3CA is a gene that provides the code for making one piece of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) protein, which is an enzyme that is part of an important signaling pathway (PI3K/AKT) involved in controlling the growth, division, survival, nutrient utilization, movement and structure of cells. PIK3CA encodes the catalytic subunit of PI3K, which is the part of the protein that lets it function as an enzyme. PI3K function is tightly maintained in normal cells. The enzymatic activity is activated by specific signals from growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) or from activated RAS proteins. PI3K then generates molecules that attract another enzyme (particularly AKT) to the cell membrane, where it is activated. The activated AKT acts on other proteins that regulate various cell processes that promotes cell growth and survival.

Mutations in PIK3CA lead to enhanced activation of its signaling function, thereby driving the tumorigenic process. These activating mutations are commonly associated with breast and colon cancer, and more rarely with melanoma of the skin. Defects in this gene have also been associated with ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, and liver cancer.

Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has identified PIK3CA mutations across a broad-spectrum of cancer types. The highest incidence of PIK3CA mutations have been found in endometrial cancer (25%), breast cancer (20%), colon cancer (25%) and cancers of the head and neck (10%). In the other major tumor types, PIK3CA mutations have been found in less than 10% of cases that have been tested. The MGH Cancer Center is a world leader in the treatment of PIK3CA mutated tumors, as well as in the number of clinical trials available for treatment with new therapies against tumors with PIK3CA mutations.

Sources: Genetics Home Reference
The PIK3CA gene encodes the p110 alpha catalytic subunit of the phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) complex. PI3K receives upstream activation signals from growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. EGFR family members), and in turn signals through AKT and mTOR in order to promote cell survival, cell growth and cellular proliferation. PIK3CA mutations lead to increased activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. PI3K function is opposed by PTEN, a lipid phosphatase that is often inactivated by mutations or silenced by methylation in many cancers.

Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has identified PIK3CA mutations across a broad-spectrum of cancer types. The highest incidence of PIK3CA mutations have been found in endometrial cancer (25%), breast cancer (20%), colon cancer (25%) and cancers of the head and neck (10%). In the other major tumor types, PIK3CA mutations have been found in less than 10% of cases that have been tested.

Sources: Genetics Home Reference
Expand Collapse E545A (c.1634A>C)  in PIK3CA
The PIK3CA E545A mutation arises from a single nucleotide change (c.1634A>C) and results in an amino acid substitution of the glutamic acid (E) at position 545 by an alanine (A).
The PIK3CA E545A mutation arises from a single nucleotide change (c.1634A>C) and results in an amino acid substitution of the glutamic acid (E) at position 545 by an alanine (A).

Mutations in PIK3CA have been found across a wide spectrum of adult and pediatric brain tumors at an incidence roughly between 5-15%.

Preclinical laboratory studies have indicated that small molecule drugs that inhibit PI3K and the related signal pathway mediators AKT and mTOR may have therapeutic activity in glioma. Inhibitors of the PI3K pathway are currently being evaluated in patients with recurrent or refractory glioblastoma multiforme. Therefore, the therapeutic implications of PIK3CA mutations in conferring therapeutic response to these investigational therapies will be determined from these clinical trial studies.

Mutations in PIK3CA have been found across a wide spectrum of adult and pediatric brain tumors at an incidence roughly between 5-15%.

Preclinical laboratory studies have indicated that small molecule drugs that inhibit PI3K and the related signal pathway mediators AKT and mTOR may have therapeutic activity in glioma. Inhibitors of the PI3K pathway are currently being evaluated in patients with recurrent or refractory glioblastoma multiforme. Therefore, the therapeutic implications of PIK3CA mutations in conferring therapeutic response to these investigational therapies will be determined from these clinical trial studies.

PubMed ID's
15289301, 21325073, 19208828, 21191045
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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease, (G) - Gene, (M) - Mutation
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 45 Per Page:
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Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02335918 A Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of Anti-CD27 (Varlilumab) and Anti-PD-1 (Nivolumab) in Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors A Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of Anti-CD27 (Varlilumab) and Anti-PD-1 (Nivolumab) in Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02586857 A Phase 1b/2, Multicenter, Open-label Study of ACP-196 in Subjects With Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) A Phase 1b/2, Multicenter, Open-label Study of ACP-196 in Subjects With Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) MGH Open D
NCT02431572 A Pilot Study to Evaluate PBR PET in Brain Tumor Patients Treated With Chemoradiation or Immunotherapy A Pilot Study to Evaluate PBR PET in Brain Tumor Patients Treated With Chemoradiation or Immunotherapy MGH Open D
NCT02981940 A Study of Abemaciclib in Recurrent Glioblastoma A Study of Abemaciclib in Recurrent Glioblastoma MGH Open D
NCT02573324 A Study of ABT-414 in Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma (GBM) With Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Amplification A Study of ABT-414 in Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma (GBM) With Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Amplification MGH Open D
NCT02927340 A Study of Lorlatinib in Advanced ALK and ROS1 Rearranged Lung Cancer With CNS Metastasis in the Absence of Measurable Extracranial Lesions A Study of Lorlatinib in Advanced ALK and ROS1 Rearranged Lung Cancer With CNS Metastasis in the Absence of Measurable Extracranial Lesions MGH Open D
NCT02857426 A Study of Nivolumab in Relapsed/Refractory Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma (PCNSL) and Relapsed/Refractory Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) A Study of Nivolumab in Relapsed/Refractory Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma (PCNSL) and Relapsed/Refractory Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) MGH Open D
NCT02428712 A Study of PLX8394 as a Single Agent in Patients With Advanced Unresectable Solid Tumors A Study of PLX8394 as a Single Agent in Patients With Advanced Unresectable Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02693990 A Trial of Increased Dose Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for High-Grade Meningiomas A Trial of Increased Dose Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for High-Grade Meningiomas MGH Open D
NCT02748135 A Two-Part Study of TB-403 in Pediatric Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Medulloblastoma A Two-Part Study of TB-403 in Pediatric Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Medulloblastoma MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 45 Per Page:
12345Next »
Our Brain Cancer Team

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