Brain Tumors

View:
Expand Collapse Brain Tumors  - General Description Data summarized by the CBTRUS (the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States) Statistical Report: Primary Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors diagnosed in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012 was analyzed and published in 2015. It includes malignant and non-malignant tumors in brain, meninges, spinal cord, cranial nerves, and other parts of the central nervous system, pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity. In the 2015 published report, the final number of all newly diagnosed tumors including all of the above was 356,858 in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012. The most commonly diagnosed CNS tumors are meningiomas (36.4% for this time period), followed by tumors of the pituitary (15.5% for this time period). Gliomas are tumors that arise from glial or precursor cells in the CNS, and include glioblastoma (15.1% for this time period), astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, ependymoma, mixed glioma and malignant glioma, and a few other rare histologies. Of the 356,858 tumors included in the CBTRUS 2015 analysis, 239,835 (67.2%) were non-malignant tumors, while 117,023 of the CNS tumors for this time period were malignant.
Few definitive observations on environmental or occupational causes of primary Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors have been made. The following risk factors have been considered: Exposure to vinyl chloride may be a risk factor for glioma. Radiation exposure is a risk factor for meningioma. Epstein-Barr virus infection has been implicated in the etiology of primary CNS lymphoma. Transplant recipients and patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome have substantially increased risks for primary CNS lymphoma.
Familial tumor syndromes and related chromosomal abnormalities that are associated with CNS neoplasms include the following: Neurofibromatosis type I (17q11), neurofibromatosis type II (22q12), von Hippel-Lindau disease (3p25-26), tuberous sclerosis complex (9q34, 16p13), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (17p13), Turcot syndrome type 1 (3p21, 7p22), Turcot syndrome type 2 (5q21), nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (9q22.3) and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (11q13).

Sources: National Cancer Institute, 2016
CBTRUS Statistical Report: Primary Brain and CNS Tumors Diagnosed in the US in 2008-2012; Neuro Oncol; 2015


Data summarized by the CBTRUS (the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States) Statistical Report: Primary Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors diagnosed in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012 was analyzed and published in 2015. It includes malignant and non-malignant tumors in brain, meninges, spinal cord, cranial nerves, and other parts of the central nervous system, pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity. In the 2015 published report, the final number of all newly diagnosed tumors including all of the above was 356,858 in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012. The most commonly diagnosed CNS tumors are meningiomas (36.4% for this time period), followed by tumors of the pituitary (15.5% for this time period). Gliomas are tumors that arise from glial or precursor cells in the CNS, and include glioblastoma (15.1% for this time period), astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, ependymoma, mixed glioma and malignant glioma, and a few other rare histologies. Of the 356,858 tumors included in the CBTRUS 2015 analysis, 239,835 (67.2%) were non-malignant tumors, while 117,023 of the CNS tumors for this time period were malignant.
Few definitive observations on environmental or occupational causes of primary Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors have been made. The following risk factors have been considered: Exposure to vinyl chloride may be a risk factor for glioma. Radiation exposure is a risk factor for meningioma. Epstein-Barr virus infection has been implicated in the etiology of primary CNS lymphoma. Transplant recipients and patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome have substantially increased risks for primary CNS lymphoma.
Familial tumor syndromes and related chromosomal abnormalities that are associated with CNS neoplasms include the following: Neurofibromatosis type I (17q11), neurofibromatosis type II (22q12), von Hippel-Lindau disease (3p25-26), tuberous sclerosis complex (9q34, 16p13), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (17p13), Turcot syndrome type 1 (3p21, 7p22), Turcot syndrome type 2 (5q21), nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (9q22.3) and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (11q13).

Sources: National Cancer Institute, 2016
CBTRUS Statistical Report: Primary Brain and CNS Tumors Diagnosed in the US in 2008-2012; Neuro Oncol; 2015


Data summarized by the CBTRUS (the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States) Statistical Report: Primary Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors diagnosed in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012 was analyzed and published in 2015. It includes malignant and non-malignant tumors in brain, meninges, spinal cord, cranial nerves, and other parts of the central nervous system, pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity. In the 2015 published report, the final number of all newly diagnosed tumors including all of the above was 356,858 in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012. The most commonly diagnosed CNS tumors are meningiomas (36.4% for this time period), followed by tumors of the pituitary (15.5% for this time period). Gliomas are tumors that arise from glial or precursor cells in the CNS, and include glioblastoma (15.1% for this time period), astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, ependymoma, mixed glioma and malignant glioma, and a few other rare histologies. Of the 356,858 tumors included in the CBTRUS 2015 analysis, 239,835 (67.2%) were non-malignant tumors, while 117,023 of the CNS tumors for this time period were malignant.
Few definitive observations on environmental or occupational causes of primary Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors have been made. The following risk factors have been considered: Exposure to vinyl chloride may be a risk factor for glioma. Radiation exposure is a risk factor for meningioma. Epstein-Barr virus infection has been implicated in the etiology of primary CNS lymphoma. Transplant recipients and patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome have substantially increased risks for primary CNS lymphoma.
Familial tumor syndromes and related chromosomal abnormalities that are associated with CNS neoplasms include the following: Neurofibromatosis type I (17q11), neurofibromatosis type II (22q12), von Hippel-Lindau disease (3p25-26), tuberous sclerosis complex (9q34, 16p13), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (17p13), Turcot syndrome type 1 (3p21, 7p22), Turcot syndrome type 2 (5q21), nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (9q22.3) and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (11q13).

Sources: National Cancer Institute, 2016
CBTRUS Statistical Report: Primary Brain and CNS Tumors Diagnosed in the US in 2008-2012; Neuro Oncol; 2015


Data summarized by the CBTRUS (the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States) Statistical Report: Primary Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors diagnosed in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012 was analyzed and published in 2015. It includes malignant and non-malignant tumors in brain, meninges, spinal cord, cranial nerves, and other parts of the central nervous system, pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity. In the 2015 published report, the final number of all newly diagnosed tumors including all of the above was 356,858 in the U.S. between 2008 and 2012. The most commonly diagnosed CNS tumors are meningiomas (36.4% for this time period), followed by tumors of the pituitary (15.5% for this time period). Gliomas are tumors that arise from glial or precursor cells in the CNS, and include glioblastoma (15.1% for this time period), astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, ependymoma, mixed glioma and malignant glioma, and a few other rare histologies. Of the 356,858 tumors included in the CBTRUS 2015 analysis, 239,835 (67.2%) were non-malignant tumors, while 117,023 of the CNS tumors for this time period were malignant.
Few definitive observations on environmental or occupational causes of primary Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors have been made. The following risk factors have been considered: Exposure to vinyl chloride may be a risk factor for glioma. Radiation exposure is a risk factor for meningioma. Epstein-Barr virus infection has been implicated in the etiology of primary CNS lymphoma. Transplant recipients and patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome have substantially increased risks for primary CNS lymphoma.
Familial tumor syndromes and related chromosomal abnormalities that are associated with CNS neoplasms include the following: Neurofibromatosis type I (17q11), neurofibromatosis type II (22q12), von Hippel-Lindau disease (3p25-26), tuberous sclerosis complex (9q34, 16p13), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (17p13), Turcot syndrome type 1 (3p21, 7p22), Turcot syndrome type 2 (5q21), nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (9q22.3) and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (11q13).

Sources: National Cancer Institute, 2016
CBTRUS Statistical Report: Primary Brain and CNS Tumors Diagnosed in the US in 2008-2012; Neuro Oncol; 2015


Expand Collapse No gene selected  - General Description
Cancer research and treatments are constantly changing. Knowing the gene associated with your cancer can help doctors determine the most appropriate direction of care for you. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.

Share with your Physican

Print information for your Physician.

Print information

Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 15 Per Page:
12Next »
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02335918 A Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of Anti-CD27 (Varlilumab) and Anti-PD-1 (Nivolumab) in Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors A Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of Anti-CD27 (Varlilumab) and Anti-PD-1 (Nivolumab) in Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02523014 A Study Looking at Targeted Therapy According to Tumor Markers for People With Meningiomas A Study Looking at Targeted Therapy According to Tumor Markers for People With Meningiomas MGH Open D
NCT02573324 A Study of ABT-414 in Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma (GBM) With Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Amplification A Study of ABT-414 in Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma (GBM) With Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Amplification MGH Open D
NCT02927340 A Study of Lorlatinib in Advanced ALK and ROS1 Rearranged Lung Cancer With CNS Metastasis in the Absence of Measurable Extracranial Lesions A Study of Lorlatinib in Advanced ALK and ROS1 Rearranged Lung Cancer With CNS Metastasis in the Absence of Measurable Extracranial Lesions MGH Open D
NCT01987830 Bevacizumab w / Temozolomide PET & Vascular MRI For GBM Bevacizumab w / Temozolomide PET & Vascular MRI For GBM MGH Open D
NCT01295944 Carboplatin and Bevacizumab for Recurrent Ependymoma Carboplatin and Bevacizumab for Recurrent Ependymoma MGH Open D
NCT02764151 First in Patient Study for PF-06840003 in Malignant Gliomas First in Patient Study for PF-06840003 in Malignant Gliomas MGH Open D
NCT02525692 Oral ONC201 in Adult Recurrent Glioblastoma Oral ONC201 in Adult Recurrent Glioblastoma MGH Open D
NCT02709889 Rovalpituzumab Tesirine in Delta-Like Protein 3-Expressing Advanced Solid Tumors Rovalpituzumab Tesirine in Delta-Like Protein 3-Expressing Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01391143 Safety Study of MGA271 in Refractory Cancer Safety Study of MGA271 in Refractory Cancer MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 15 Per Page:
12Next »

Share with your Physican

Print information for your Physician.

Print information