Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcoma, TP53, All Mutations

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Expand Collapse Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcoma  - General Description This year about 12,000 people in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have cancer of the soft tissue. Sarcomas develop more commonly in adults, although certain types of sarcoma are found more typically in children.

Soft tissue sarcomas can form almost anywhere in the body, including cartilage, fat, muscle, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, and other connective or supportive tissues; osteosarcomas develop in bone, liposarcomas form in fat; rhabdomyosarcomas form in muscle; Ewing sarcomas form in bone and soft tissue; Kaposi sarcoma and uterine sarcoma are other types of soft tissue sarcomas. Because there are many types of soft tissue sarcoma, the cell type must be identified before treatment decisions are made. There are ongoing clinical trials using many forms of therapy in specific types of sarcoma.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
This year about 12,000 people in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have cancer of the soft tissue. Sarcomas develop more commonly in adults, although certain types of sarcoma are found more typically in children.

Soft tissue sarcomas can form almost anywhere in the body, including cartilage, fat, muscle, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, and other connective or supportive tissues; osteosarcomas develop in bone, liposarcomas form in fat; rhabdomyosarcomas form in muscle; Ewing sarcomas form in bone and soft tissue; Kaposi sarcoma and uterine sarcoma are other types of soft tissue sarcomas. Because there are many types of soft tissue sarcoma, the cell type must be identified before treatment decisions are made. There are ongoing clinical trials using many forms of therapy in specific types of sarcoma.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
This year about 12,000 people in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have cancer of the soft tissue. Sarcomas develop more commonly in adults, although certain types of sarcoma are found more typically in children.

Soft tissue sarcomas can form almost anywhere in the body, including cartilage, fat, muscle, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, and other connective or supportive tissues; osteosarcomas develop in bone, liposarcomas form in fat; rhabdomyosarcomas form in muscle; Ewing sarcomas form in bone and soft tissue; Kaposi sarcoma and uterine sarcoma are other types of soft tissue sarcomas. Because there are many types of soft tissue sarcoma, the cell type must be identified before treatment decisions are made. There are ongoing clinical trials using many forms of therapy in specific types of sarcoma.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
This year about 12,000 people in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have cancer of the soft tissue. Sarcomas develop more commonly in adults, although certain types of sarcoma are found more typically in children.

Soft tissue sarcomas can form almost anywhere in the body, including cartilage, fat, muscle, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, and other connective or supportive tissues; osteosarcomas develop in bone, liposarcomas form in fat; rhabdomyosarcomas form in muscle; Ewing sarcomas form in bone and soft tissue; Kaposi sarcoma and uterine sarcoma are other types of soft tissue sarcomas. Because there are many types of soft tissue sarcoma, the cell type must be identified before treatment decisions are made. There are ongoing clinical trials using many forms of therapy in specific types of sarcoma.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Expand Collapse TP53  - General Description
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The p53 (TP53) gene produces a protein, P53 which has many complex functions within the cell. It has been called the “guardian of the genome” for reasons that have to do with these complex functions. Normal, non-cancerous cells have tightly regulated pathways that control cell growth, mediating cessation of growth or even cell death when circumstances warrant it. P53 is at the center of these pathways, acting as a “tumor suppressor” in responding to circumstances in the cell that require a cessation of growth. Perhaps for this reason, P53 is one of the most commonly mutated genes across all cancer types.

P53 itself regulates the expression of several genes that are involved in growth arrest or “cell cycle arrest”. Growth arrest is important for stopping the cell from normal growth and cell division so that if, for instance, there has been damage to the DNA from UV irradiation or some other insult causing DNA damage, the cessation of the cell cycle allows DNA repair to take place before the cell resumes growth. If the damage to the DNA is too extensive to repair, or if other factors such as oncogenic stress impact the cell, P53 then has roles in other processes that are part of the cell’s repertoire of responses. These include processes such as apoptosis (programmed cell death), senescence (irreversible cell cycle arrest), autophagy (regulated destruction of selected proteins within the cell, leading to cell death), and some important metabolic changes in the cell (see graphic above, adapted with permission).

P53 is itself acted upon by proteins in the cell that detect DNA damage or oncogenic stress (see graphic depicting P53 at the center of a number of cellular responses). In the case of DNA damage to the cell, P53 is acted upon by a protein called ATM and another designated CHK2 (see glossary for more information). These proteins activate P53 to regulate the changes that will cause growth arrest. Interestingly, these two genes themselves are found to be mutated and have altered function in certain cancers. The fact that both P53 and the genes that trigger P53’s response and initiation of growth arrest are mutated in some cancers highlights the importance of P53 to normal cell growth. P53 is found to be mutated in over half of cancers studied, including ovarian cancer, colon and esophageal cancer, and many other types of cancer. Because p53 plays so many complex roles in the cell, we do not depict it in a simple graphic as we have with other proteins on this web site in which genetic alterations have been found in specific tumors that lead to dysregulation of these proteins. Rather, P53 as a negative regulator of cell growth under important circumstances plays this role at the center of a complex network of pathways within the cell. Many of the proteins involved in the pathways that regulate P53 and its responses are also found to be genetically altered in some cancers.

As we have seen, the P53 protein has many functions in the cell, and because of these many roles, its location in the nucleus or cytoplasm varies, depending on the function and when it exerts its effect during the cell cycle. One important protein that regulates P53 is called HDM2/MDM2, depicted in the graphic above. The HDM2/MDM2 protein contains a p53 binding domain, and once bound to p53, it inhibits the activation of the P53 protein, and thereby prevents P53 from regulating growth arrest, even when there is damage to the DNA. Some cancers have been found to overexpress HDM2/MDM2, meaning there is an excess of the protein which binds to P53, preventing it from exerting its important role in regulating growth arrest. Cell division that occurs despite damage to the DNA can lead to cancer. Interestingly, those cancers that have been found to over-express HDM2/MDM2 typically are not found to have p53 mutations. This provides scientists with evidence that by whatever means, either through increasing the amount of the P53 inhibitor HDM2/MDM2, or, through mutations in P53 that prevent the normal activities of the protein, the normal function of P53 is important in preventing cancer. MDM2 was named after its discovery in studies on laboratory mice. The human version of the gene is designated HumanDM2, or HDM2. Genetic alterations leading to over-expression of MDM2 are observed most commonly in sarcomas, but have also been observed in endometrial cancer, colon cancer, and stomach cancer.

Source: Molecular Genetics of Cancer, Second Edition
Chapter No. 2, Section No. 12
Leif W. Ellisen, MD, PhD
The p53 (TP53) gene produces a protein, P53 which has many complex functions within the cell. It has been called the “guardian of the genome” for reasons that have to do with these complex functions. Normal, non-cancerous cells have tightly regulated pathways that control cell growth, mediating cessation of growth or even cell death when circumstances warrant it. P53 is at the center of these pathways, acting as a “tumor suppressor” in responding to circumstances in the cell that require a cessation of growth. Perhaps for this reason, P53 is one of the most commonly mutated genes across all cancer types.

P53 itself regulates the expression of several genes that are involved in growth arrest or “cell cycle arrest”. Growth arrest is important for stopping the cell from normal growth and cell division so that if, for instance, there has been damage to the DNA from UV irradiation or some other insult causing DNA damage, the cessation of the cell cycle allows DNA repair to take place before the cell resumes growth. If the damage to the DNA is too extensive to repair, or if other factors such as oncogenic stress impact the cell, P53 then has roles in other processes that are part of the cell’s repertoire of responses. These include processes such as apoptosis (programmed cell death), senescence (irreversible cell cycle arrest), autophagy (regulated destruction of selected proteins within the cell, leading to cell death), and some important metabolic changes in the cell (see graphic above, adapted with permission).

P53 is itself acted upon by proteins in the cell that detect DNA damage or oncogenic stress (see graphic depicting P53 at the center of a number of cellular responses). In the case of DNA damage to the cell, P53 is acted upon by a protein called ATM and another designated CHK2 (see glossary for more information). These proteins activate P53 to regulate the changes that will cause growth arrest. Interestingly, these two genes themselves are found to be mutated and have altered function in certain cancers. The fact that both P53 and the genes that trigger P53’s response and initiation of growth arrest are mutated in some cancers highlights the importance of P53 to normal cell growth. P53 is found to be mutated in over half of cancers studied, including ovarian cancer, colon and esophageal cancer, and many other types of cancer. Because p53 plays so many complex roles in the cell, we do not depict it in a simple graphic as we have with other proteins on this web site in which genetic alterations have been found in specific tumors that lead to dysregulation of these proteins. Rather, P53 as a negative regulator of cell growth under important circumstances plays this role at the center of a complex network of pathways within the cell. Many of the proteins involved in the pathways that regulate P53 and its responses are also found to be genetically altered in some cancers.

As we have seen, the P53 protein has many functions in the cell, and because of these many roles, its location in the nucleus or cytoplasm varies, depending on the function and when it exerts its effect during the cell cycle. One important protein that regulates P53 is called HDM2/MDM2, depicted in the graphic above. The HDM2/MDM2 protein contains a p53 binding domain, and once bound to p53, it inhibits the activation of the P53 protein, and thereby prevents P53 from regulating growth arrest, even when there is damage to the DNA. Some cancers have been found to overexpress HDM2/MDM2, meaning there is an excess of the protein which binds to P53, preventing it from exerting its important role in regulating growth arrest. Cell division that occurs despite damage to the DNA can lead to cancer. Interestingly, those cancers that have been found to over-express HDM2/MDM2 typically are not found to have p53 mutations. This provides scientists with evidence that by whatever means, either through increasing the amount of the P53 inhibitor HDM2/MDM2, or, through mutations in P53 that prevent the normal activities of the protein, the normal function of P53 is important in preventing cancer. MDM2 was named after its discovery in studies on laboratory mice. The human version of the gene is designated HumanDM2, or HDM2. Genetic alterations leading to over-expression of MDM2 are observed most commonly in sarcomas, but have also been observed in endometrial cancer, colon cancer, and stomach cancer.

Source: Molecular Genetics of Cancer, Second Edition
Chapter No. 2, Section No. 12
Leif W. Ellisen, MD, PhD
Expand Collapse All Mutations  in TP53
TP53 Mutations that are associated with many cancer types result in the loss of function of the P53 proteins' tumor suppressor activity. Mutations in P53 that have been studied in tumors prevent P53 from acting to stop growth, or in other words, to cause cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle arrest mediated by P53 is necessary to give cells time to repair damaged DNA. P53 is also involved in other functions in the cell that cause cells that have suffered more damage than can be repaired to undergo apoptosis or autophagy, leading to deliberate cell death. When P53 normal function is debilitated through genetic mutations, the development of cancer is more likely than in cells that have intact and fully functional P53.
TP53 Mutations that are associated with many cancer types result in the loss of function of the P53 proteins' tumor suppressor activity. Mutations in P53 that have been studied in tumors prevent P53 from acting to stop growth, or in other words, to cause cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle arrest mediated by P53 is necessary to give cells time to repair damaged DNA. P53 is also involved in other functions in the cell that cause cells that have suffered more damage than can be repaired to undergo apoptosis or autophagy, leading to deliberate cell death. When P53 normal function is debilitated through genetic mutations, the development of cancer is more likely than in cells that have intact and fully functional P53.

A spectrum of mutations of the p53 gene have been observed in bone and soft tissue sarcomas of various histological classifications. Genetic alterations of the p53 gene included mutations (a single nucleotide substitution), small deletions (a segment of the gene was missing), and single base insertions. In contrast to reported findings for some other types of cancer, mutations of the p53 gene in sarcomas are quite varied. In one survey of different types of sarcoma tumors, approximately one-half of the osteosarcomas did not have detectable alterations in the coding sequence of the p53 gene.

A spectrum of mutations of the p53 gene have been observed in bone and soft tissue sarcomas of various histological classifications. Genetic alterations of the p53 gene included mutations (a single nucleotide substitution), small deletions (a segment of the gene was missing), and single base insertions. In contrast to reported findings for some other types of cancer, mutations of the p53 gene in sarcomas are quite varied. In one survey of different types of sarcoma tumors, approximately one-half of the osteosarcomas did not have detectable alterations in the coding sequence of the p53 gene.

PubMed ID's
8260365,

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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease, (G) - Gene, (M) - Mutation
Trial Status: Showing all 9 results Per Page:
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02601950 A Phase II, Multicenter Study of the EZH2 Inhibitor Tazemetostat in Adult Subjects With INI1-Negative Tumors or Relapsed/Refractory Synovial Sarcoma A Phase II, Multicenter Study of the EZH2 Inhibitor Tazemetostat in Adult Subjects With INI1-Negative Tumors or Relapsed/Refractory Synovial Sarcoma MGH Open D
NCT00585195 A Study Of Oral PF-02341066, A c-Met/Hepatocyte Growth Factor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, In Patients With Advanced Cancer A Study Of Oral PF-02341066, A c-Met/Hepatocyte Growth Factor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, In Patients With Advanced Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02642016 A Study to Evaluate the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of KTN0158 in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Study to Evaluate the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of KTN0158 in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02568267 Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions) Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions) MGH Open D
NCT02611024 Pharmacokinetic Study of PM01183 in Combination With Irinotecan in Patients With Selected Solid Tumors Pharmacokinetic Study of PM01183 in Combination With Irinotecan in Patients With Selected Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01858168 Phase I Study of Olaprib and Temozolomide for Ewings Sarcoma Phase I Study of Olaprib and Temozolomide for Ewings Sarcoma MGH Open D
NCT02180867 Radiation Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy or Pazopanib Hydrochloride Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Can Be Removed by Surgery Radiation Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy or Pazopanib Hydrochloride Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Can Be Removed by Surgery MGH Open D
NCT02576431 Study of LOXO-101 in Subjects With NTRK Fusion Positive Solid Tumors (NAVIGATE) Study of LOXO-101 in Subjects With NTRK Fusion Positive Solid Tumors (NAVIGATE) MGH Open D
NCT02660034 The Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Antitumor Activity of the BGB-A317 in Combination With the BGB-290 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors The Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Antitumor Activity of the BGB-A317 in Combination With the BGB-290 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
MGH has many open clinical trials for other cancers not shown on the Targeted Cancer Care website. They can be found on the MassGeneral.org clinical trials search page.

Additional clinical trials may be applicable to your search criteria, but they may not be available at MGH. These clinical trials can typically be found by searching the clinicaltrials.gov website.
Trial Status: Showing all 9 results Per Page:

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