Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcoma, FGFR 1, 2, 3 and 4

View:
Expand Collapse Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcoma  - General Description This year about 12,000 people in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have cancer of the soft tissue. Sarcomas develop more commonly in adults, although certain types of sarcoma are found more typically in children.

Soft tissue sarcomas can form almost anywhere in the body, including cartilage, fat, muscle, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, and other connective or supportive tissues; osteosarcomas develop in bone, liposarcomas form in fat; rhabdomyosarcomas form in muscle; Ewing sarcomas form in bone and soft tissue; Kaposi sarcoma and uterine sarcoma are other types of soft tissue sarcomas. Because there are many types of soft tissue sarcoma, the cell type must be identified before treatment decisions are made. There are ongoing clinical trials using many forms of therapy in specific types of sarcoma.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
This year about 12,000 people in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have cancer of the soft tissue. Sarcomas develop more commonly in adults, although certain types of sarcoma are found more typically in children.

Soft tissue sarcomas can form almost anywhere in the body, including cartilage, fat, muscle, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, and other connective or supportive tissues; osteosarcomas develop in bone, liposarcomas form in fat; rhabdomyosarcomas form in muscle; Ewing sarcomas form in bone and soft tissue; Kaposi sarcoma and uterine sarcoma are other types of soft tissue sarcomas. Because there are many types of soft tissue sarcoma, the cell type must be identified before treatment decisions are made. There are ongoing clinical trials using many forms of therapy in specific types of sarcoma.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
This year about 12,000 people in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have cancer of the soft tissue. Sarcomas develop more commonly in adults, although certain types of sarcoma are found more typically in children.

Soft tissue sarcomas can form almost anywhere in the body, including cartilage, fat, muscle, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, and other connective or supportive tissues; osteosarcomas develop in bone, liposarcomas form in fat; rhabdomyosarcomas form in muscle; Ewing sarcomas form in bone and soft tissue; Kaposi sarcoma and uterine sarcoma are other types of soft tissue sarcomas. Because there are many types of soft tissue sarcoma, the cell type must be identified before treatment decisions are made. There are ongoing clinical trials using many forms of therapy in specific types of sarcoma.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
This year about 12,000 people in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have cancer of the soft tissue. Sarcomas develop more commonly in adults, although certain types of sarcoma are found more typically in children.

Soft tissue sarcomas can form almost anywhere in the body, including cartilage, fat, muscle, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, and other connective or supportive tissues; osteosarcomas develop in bone, liposarcomas form in fat; rhabdomyosarcomas form in muscle; Ewing sarcomas form in bone and soft tissue; Kaposi sarcoma and uterine sarcoma are other types of soft tissue sarcomas. Because there are many types of soft tissue sarcoma, the cell type must be identified before treatment decisions are made. There are ongoing clinical trials using many forms of therapy in specific types of sarcoma.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Expand Collapse FGFR 1, 2, 3 and 4  - General Description
CLICK IMAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION
Fibroblast growth factors (FGF’s) are ligands that bind to FGF cell surface receptors (FGFR’s) and activate them. Once activated, FGFR’s on normal cells transmit a growth signal inside the cell. This growth signal is transmitted via two important pathways inside cells; the RAS-dependent MAP kinase pathway, and a second signal pathway that involves PI3K and AKT. There are four different FGFR’s that make up a family of FGFR tyrosine kinase cell surface receptors, each having an extracellular domain that binds FGF ligands, a second domain that goes through the cell outer membrane, and a third domain that is inside the cell cytoplasm (see diagram above). FGFR signaling in normal cells stimulates proliferation, differentiation, embryonic development, cell migration, survival, angiogenesis (vascularization), and organogenesis (organ development).

Recently, FGFR genetic abnormalities have been found in several types of cancer. There are four FGFR family members, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4. Alterations in FGFR genes result in dysregulated FGF receptors and can promote cancer growth and metastasis. In a recent study of almost 5000 tumors, alterations in FGFR were found in 7% of of tumors. Among these tumors, alterations were identified in all 4 FGFR’s including FGFR1 (49%), FGFR2 (19%), FGFR3 (23%), and FGFR4 (7%). A small number of the tumors had genetic alterations in more than one type of FGFR. Clearly cancers have found a way to take advantage of FGF/FGFR signaling pathway in cells to cause uncontrolled growth leading to tumors.

While the FGFR genetic abnormalities may vary in frequency depending on the group of tumor types tested, there are clearly some patterns emerging in terms of which tumor types are likely to have specific kinds of genetic alterations in FGFR 1, 2, 3 or 4. Genetic alterations in the FGFR receptors can include point mutations, insertions/deletions, gene amplification, or translocations. The sensitivity of various gene alterations to FGFR inhibition is currently under investigation. Drugs targeting the FGF/FGFR pathway include small molecule tyrosine kinases inhibitors and ligand traps.

Several pharmaceutical companies have developed drugs that target and inhibit FGFR in tumors. Some of these are designed to target multiple members of the FGFR family. At MGH and other major cancer centers, clinical trials are available to patients whose tumors have been tested and found to have genetically altered FGFR. Treatment for these patients can be available on clinical studies testing these FGFR inhibitors, including FGFR inhibitors called TAS120 and Debio 1347. Other agents such as FGF401 and BLU554 are specific for inhibiting FGFR4 and are being tested in liver cancer. Contact the MGH Cancer Center to find out more about having genetic testing performed on a tumor, or for more information about these clinical trials.

Fibroblast growth factors (FGF’s) are ligands that bind to FGF cell surface receptors (FGFR’s) and activate them. Once activated, FGFR’s on normal cells transmit a growth signal inside the cell. This growth signal is transmitted via two important pathways inside cells; the RAS-dependent MAP kinase pathway, and a second signal pathway that involves PI3K and AKT. There are four different FGFR’s that make up a family of FGFR tyrosine kinase cell surface receptors, each having an extracellular domain that binds FGF ligands, a second domain that goes through the cell outer membrane, and a third domain that is inside the cell cytoplasm (see diagram above). FGFR signaling in normal cells stimulates proliferation, differentiation, embryonic development, cell migration, survival, angiogenesis (vascularization), and organogenesis (organ development).

Recently, FGFR genetic abnormalities have been found in several types of cancer. There are four FGFR family members, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4. Alterations in FGFR genes result in dysregulated FGF receptors and can promote cancer growth and metastasis. In a recent study of almost 5000 tumors, alterations in FGFR were found in 7% of of tumors. Among these tumors, alterations were identified in all 4 FGFR’s including FGFR1 (49%), FGFR2 (19%), FGFR3 (23%), and FGFR4 (7%). A small number of the tumors had genetic alterations in more than one type of FGFR. Clearly cancers have found a way to take advantage of FGF/FGFR signaling pathway in cells to cause uncontrolled growth leading to tumors.

While the FGFR genetic abnormalities may vary in frequency depending on the group of tumor types tested, there are clearly some patterns emerging in terms of which tumor types are likely to have specific kinds of genetic alterations in FGFR 1, 2, 3 or 4. Genetic alterations in the FGFR receptors can include point mutations, insertions/deletions, gene amplification, or translocations. The sensitivity of various gene alterations to FGFR inhibition is currently under investigation. Drugs targeting the FGF/FGFR pathway include small molecule tyrosine kinases inhibitors and ligand traps.

Several pharmaceutical companies have developed drugs that target and inhibit FGFR in tumors. Some of these are designed to target multiple members of the FGFR family. At MGH and other major cancer centers, clinical trials are available to patients whose tumors have been tested and found to have genetically altered FGFR. Treatment for these patients can be available on clinical studies testing these FGFR inhibitors, including FGFR inhibitors called TAS120 and Debio 1347. Other agents such as FGF401 and BLU554 are specific for inhibiting FGFR4 and are being tested in liver cancer. Contact the MGH Cancer Center to find out more about having genetic testing performed on a tumor, or for more information about these clinical trials.

PubMed ID's
9212826, 24265351
Expand Collapse FGFR 1, 2, 3 and 4  in Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcoma
New information on cancer, genes, and mutations is being discovered each day. Currently, researchers have not found any information on the gene and disease you have chosen. Please check back as new data may be available soon.
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.

Share with your Physican

Print information for your Physician.

Print information

Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease, (G) - Gene
Trial Status: Showing all 10 results Per Page:
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02601950 A Phase II, Multicenter Study of the EZH2 Inhibitor Tazemetostat in Adult Subjects With INI1-Negative Tumors or Relapsed/Refractory Synovial Sarcoma A Phase II, Multicenter Study of the EZH2 Inhibitor Tazemetostat in Adult Subjects With INI1-Negative Tumors or Relapsed/Refractory Synovial Sarcoma MGH Open D
NCT00585195 A Study Of Oral PF-02341066, A c-Met/Hepatocyte Growth Factor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, In Patients With Advanced Cancer A Study Of Oral PF-02341066, A c-Met/Hepatocyte Growth Factor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, In Patients With Advanced Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02642016 A Study to Evaluate the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of KTN0158 in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Study to Evaluate the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of KTN0158 in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02568267 Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions) Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions) MGH Open D
NCT02611024 Pharmacokinetic Study of PM01183 in Combination With Irinotecan in Patients With Selected Solid Tumors Pharmacokinetic Study of PM01183 in Combination With Irinotecan in Patients With Selected Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01858168 Phase I Study of Olaprib and Temozolomide for Ewings Sarcoma Phase I Study of Olaprib and Temozolomide for Ewings Sarcoma MGH Open D
NCT01659203 Proton or Photon RT for Retroperitoneal Sarcomas Proton or Photon RT for Retroperitoneal Sarcomas MGH Open D
NCT02180867 Radiation Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy or Pazopanib Hydrochloride Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Can Be Removed by Surgery Radiation Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy or Pazopanib Hydrochloride Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Can Be Removed by Surgery MGH Open D
NCT02576431 Study of LOXO-101 in Subjects With NTRK Fusion Positive Solid Tumors (NAVIGATE) Study of LOXO-101 in Subjects With NTRK Fusion Positive Solid Tumors (NAVIGATE) MGH Open D
NCT02660034 The Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Antitumor Activity of the BGB-A317 in Combination With the BGB-290 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors The Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Antitumor Activity of the BGB-A317 in Combination With the BGB-290 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
MGH has many open clinical trials for other cancers not shown on the Targeted Cancer Care website. They can be found on the MassGeneral.org clinical trials search page.

Additional clinical trials may be applicable to your search criteria, but they may not be available at MGH. These clinical trials can typically be found by searching the clinicaltrials.gov website.
Trial Status: Showing all 10 results Per Page:

Share with your Physican

Print information for your Physician.

Print information