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EGFR, G719S (c.2155G>A)

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Expand Collapse No disease selected  - General Description
Mass General Hospital Cancer Center treats patients with many cancer types. To learn more about the different cancer types that can be treated at the Cancer Center, please visit the Cancer Center website at the following page: http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/services/
Expand Collapse EGFR  - General Description The EGFR gene encodes for a cell-surface protein known as the epidermal growth factor receptor, which is found in many normal epithelial tissues such as the skin and hair follicles. When epidermal growth factor ligand bind to EGFR, they activate several different cell signaling pathways that control various cell functions, including cell growth and proliferation. Mutations in EGFR can lead to unregulated activation of the protein. These types of activating mutations are often found in NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer), glioblastoma and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Sometimes, excess EGFR protein is produced due to the presence of too many copies of the EGFR gene, leading to excessive cell division and growth in the presence of epidermal growth factor. Among the human cancers in which EGFR overabundance is present are cancers of the head and neck (squamous cell), colon, rectum, lung (NSCLC), central nervous system (glioblastoma), pancreas and breast (HER2-positive metastatic). Blocking EGFR in tumors may keep cancer cells from growing. The FDA has approved several therapies that target EGFR in one or more cancers. Testing for genetic alterations of EGFR is available at the MGH genetics lab. Treatment for EGFR-mutant tumors, along with clinical trials testing new drugs for the treatment of EGFR-mutant tumors are available at the MGH Cancer Center. Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has indicated that EGFR mutations occur primarily in lung cancer (~15%), but also in a minor subset of gastric (2%), brain (1%) and pancreatic (1%) cancers. Source: Genetics Home ReferenceThe EGFR gene encodes for a cell-surface protein known as the epidermal growth factor receptor, which is found in many normal epithelial tissues such as the skin and hair follicles. When epidermal growth factor ligand bind to EGFR, they activate several different cell signaling pathways that control various cell functions, including cell growth and proliferation. Mutations in EGFR can lead to unregulated activation of the protein. These types of activating mutations are often found in NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer), glioblastoma and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Sometimes, excess EGFR protein is produced due to the presence of too many copies of the EGFR gene, leading to excessive cell division and growth in the presence of epidermal growth factor. Among the human cancers in which EGFR overabundance is present are cancers of the head and neck (squamous cell), colon, rectum, lung (NSCLC), central nervous system (glioblastoma), pancreas and breast (HER2-positive metastatic). Blocking EGFR in tumors may keep cancer cells from growing. The FDA has approved several therapies that target EGFR in one or more cancers. Testing for genetic alterations of EGFR is available at the MGH genetics lab. Treatment for EGFR-mutant tumors, along with clinical trials testing new drugs for the treatment of EGFR-mutant tumors are available at the MGH Cancer Center. Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has indicated that EGFR mutations occur primarily in lung cancer (~15%), but also in a minor subset of gastric (2%), brain (1%) and pancreatic (1%) cancers. Source: Genetics Home Reference
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The EGFR gene encodes for a cell-surface protein known as the epidermal growth factor receptor, which is found in many normal epithelial tissues such as the skin and hair follicles. When epidermal growth factor ligand bind to EGFR, they activate several different cell signaling pathways that control various cell functions, including cell growth and proliferation.

Mutations in EGFR can lead to unregulated activation of the protein. These types of activating mutations are often found in NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer), glioblastoma and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Sometimes, excess EGFR protein is produced due to the presence of too many copies of the EGFR gene, leading to excessive cell division and growth in the presence of epidermal growth factor. Among the human cancers in which EGFR overabundance is present are cancers of the head and neck (squamous cell), colon, rectum, lung (NSCLC), central nervous system (glioblastoma), pancreas and breast (HER2-positive metastatic). Blocking EGFR in tumors may keep cancer cells from growing. The FDA has approved several therapies that target EGFR in one or more cancers. Testing for genetic alterations of EGFR is available at the MGH genetics lab. Treatment for EGFR-mutant tumors, along with clinical trials testing new drugs for the treatment of EGFR-mutant tumors are available at the MGH Cancer Center.

Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has indicated that EGFR mutations occur primarily in lung cancer (~15%), but also in a minor subset of gastric (2%), brain (1%) and pancreatic (1%) cancers.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
The EGFR gene encodes for a cell-surface protein known as the epidermal growth factor receptor, which is found in many normal epithelial tissues such as the skin and hair follicles. When epidermal growth factor ligand bind to EGFR, they activate several different cell signaling pathways that control various cell functions, including cell growth and proliferation.

Mutations in EGFR can lead to unregulated activation of the protein. These types of activating mutations are often found in NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer), glioblastoma and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Sometimes, excess EGFR protein is produced due to the presence of too many copies of the EGFR gene, leading to excessive cell division and growth in the presence of epidermal growth factor. Among the human cancers in which EGFR overabundance is present are cancers of the head and neck (squamous cell), colon, rectum, lung (NSCLC), central nervous system (glioblastoma), pancreas and breast (HER2-positive metastatic). Blocking EGFR in tumors may keep cancer cells from growing. The FDA has approved several therapies that target EGFR in one or more cancers. Testing for genetic alterations of EGFR is available at the MGH genetics lab. Treatment for EGFR-mutant tumors, along with clinical trials testing new drugs for the treatment of EGFR-mutant tumors are available at the MGH Cancer Center.

Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has indicated that EGFR mutations occur primarily in lung cancer (~15%), but also in a minor subset of gastric (2%), brain (1%) and pancreatic (1%) cancers.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
PubMed ID's
15864276, 15118073, 15118125, 15329413, 18772890, 15837736, 16720329, 21057220
Expand Collapse G719S (c.2155G>A)  in EGFR
The EGFR G719S mutation arises from the nucleotide change c.2155G>A in exon 18, resulting in an amino acid substitution of the glycine (G) at position 719 by a serine (S).
The EGFR G719S mutation arises from the nucleotide change c.2155G>A in exon 18, resulting in an amino acid substitution of the glycine (G) at position 719 by a serine (S).

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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (G) - Gene, (M) - Mutation
Trial Status: Showing all 9 results Per Page:
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT03292133 A Study of EGF816 and Gefitinib in TKI-naïve EGFR-mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer A Study of EGF816 and Gefitinib in TKI-naïve EGFR-mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer MGH Open GM
NCT01553942 Afatinib With CT and RT for EGFR-Mutant NSCLC Afatinib With CT and RT for EGFR-Mutant NSCLC MGH Open GM
NCT03114319 Dose Finding Study of TNO155 in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors Dose Finding Study of TNO155 in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open GM
NCT01953926 Neratinib HER Mutation Basket Study (SUMMIT) Neratinib HER Mutation Basket Study (SUMMIT) MGH Open GM
NCT02496663 Osimertinib and Necitumumab in Treating Patients With EGFR-Mutant Stage IV or Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Who Have Progressed on a Previous EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Osimertinib and Necitumumab in Treating Patients With EGFR-Mutant Stage IV or Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Who Have Progressed on a Previous EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor MGH Open GM
NCT02154490 Lung-MAP: Biomarker-Targeted Second-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Cancer Lung-MAP: Biomarker-Targeted Second-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Cancer MGH Open G
NCT03055013 Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Localized Kidney Cancer Undergoing Nephrectomy Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Localized Kidney Cancer Undergoing Nephrectomy MGH Open G
NCT03318939 Phase 2 Study of Poziotinib in Patients With NSCLC Having EGFR or HER2 Exon 20 Insertion Mutation Phase 2 Study of Poziotinib in Patients With NSCLC Having EGFR or HER2 Exon 20 Insertion Mutation MGH Open G
NCT03614728 Study to Investigate the Safety and Clinical Activity of GSK3326595 and Other Agents to Treat Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) and Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) Study to Investigate the Safety and Clinical Activity of GSK3326595 and Other Agents to Treat Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) and Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) MGH Open G
MGH has many open clinical trials for other cancers not shown on the Targeted Cancer Care website. They can be found on the MassGeneral.org clinical trials search page.

Additional clinical trials may be applicable to your search criteria, but they may not be available at MGH. These clinical trials can typically be found by searching the clinicaltrials.gov website.
Trial Status: Showing all 9 results Per Page:

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