Melanoma

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Expand Collapse Melanoma  - General Description Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. The prognosis for these two types of skin cancer is generally good. Both can often be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently mutated in melanoma. The most common BRAF mutations occur at position V600. Vemurafenib is an effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma that has a BRAF V600E mutation. Other melanoma-associated mutations that occur in BRAF also activate the protein abnormally, and can be treated with other targeted agents. Some are sensitive to a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors. The combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in other genes have been found in melanomas, such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, TP53, Cyclin D1 (CCND1), CDKN2,and KIT. Mutations in these genes may provide opportunities for enrollment in ongoing clinical trials. Immunology therapies are also being studied in melanoma for patients whose tumors have been tested for specific characteristics. Immuno-therapies are also being tested in combination with targeted therapies in clinical trials at the MGH Cancer Center.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. The prognosis for these two types of skin cancer is generally good. Both can often be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently mutated in melanoma. The most common BRAF mutations occur at position V600. Vemurafenib is an effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma that has a BRAF V600E mutation. Other melanoma-associated mutations that occur in BRAF also activate the protein abnormally, and can be treated with other targeted agents. Some are sensitive to a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors. The combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in other genes have been found in melanomas, such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, TP53, Cyclin D1 (CCND1), CDKN2,and KIT. Mutations in these genes may provide opportunities for enrollment in ongoing clinical trials. Immunology therapies are also being studied in melanoma for patients whose tumors have been tested for specific characteristics. Immuno-therapies are also being tested in combination with targeted therapies in clinical trials at the MGH Cancer Center.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. The prognosis for these two types of skin cancer is generally good. Both can often be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently mutated in melanoma. The most common BRAF mutations occur at position V600. Vemurafenib is an effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma that has a BRAF V600E mutation. Other melanoma-associated mutations that occur in BRAF also activate the protein abnormally, and can be treated with other targeted agents. Some are sensitive to a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors. The combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in other genes have been found in melanomas, such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, TP53, Cyclin D1 (CCND1), CDKN2,and KIT. Mutations in these genes may provide opportunities for enrollment in ongoing clinical trials. Immunology therapies are also being studied in melanoma for patients whose tumors have been tested for specific characteristics. Immuno-therapies are also being tested in combination with targeted therapies in clinical trials at the MGH Cancer Center.

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells and accounts for more than 50 percent of all cancers. There are generally three different types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma usually appear on sun-exposed areas of the body. The prognosis for these two types of skin cancer is generally good. Both can often be effectively treated through surgery, with a minority of cases requiring radiation treatment.

Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and arises in the cells that produce pigment (color) in the skin. BRAF is the gene that is most frequently mutated in melanoma. The most common BRAF mutations occur at position V600. Vemurafenib is an effective FDA-approved targeted agent that is available to treat unresectable or metastatic melanoma that has a BRAF V600E mutation. Other melanoma-associated mutations that occur in BRAF also activate the protein abnormally, and can be treated with other targeted agents. Some are sensitive to a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors. The combination of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with the MEK inhibitor trametinib was approved by FDA for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations. While less frequent, mutations in other genes have been found in melanomas, such as NRAS, MEK, PTEN, TP53, Cyclin D1 (CCND1), CDKN2,and KIT. Mutations in these genes may provide opportunities for enrollment in ongoing clinical trials. Immunology therapies are also being studied in melanoma for patients whose tumors have been tested for specific characteristics. Immuno-therapies are also being tested in combination with targeted therapies in clinical trials at the MGH Cancer Center.

PubMed ID's
21343559, 22798288, 20551065
Expand Collapse No gene selected  - General Description
Cancer research and treatments are constantly changing. Knowing the gene associated with your cancer can help doctors determine the most appropriate direction of care for you. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.

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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 48 Per Page:
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Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02637531 A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of IPI-549 A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of IPI-549 MGH Open D
NCT03192345 A First-in-human Study of the Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Anti-tumor Activity of SAR439459 Monotherapy and Combination of SAR439459 and REGN2810 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A First-in-human Study of the Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Anti-tumor Activity of SAR439459 Monotherapy and Combination of SAR439459 and REGN2810 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02561234 A Multiple Dose, Dose Escalation Trial of AEB1102 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Multiple Dose, Dose Escalation Trial of AEB1102 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02897765 A Personal Cancer Vaccine (NEO-PV-01) w/ Nivolumab for Patients With Melanoma, Lung Cancer or Bladder Cancer A Personal Cancer Vaccine (NEO-PV-01) w/ Nivolumab for Patients With Melanoma, Lung Cancer or Bladder Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02817633 A Phase 1 Study of TSR-022, an Anti-TIM-3 Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Phase 1 Study of TSR-022, an Anti-TIM-3 Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02110355 A Phase 1b/2a Study Evaluating AMG 232 in Metastatic Melanoma A Phase 1b/2a Study Evaluating AMG 232 in Metastatic Melanoma MGH Open D
NCT03148418 A Study in Participants Previously Enrolled in a Genentech− and/or F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd-Sponsored Atezolizumab Study (IMbrella A) A Study in Participants Previously Enrolled in a Genentech− and/or F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd-Sponsored Atezolizumab Study (IMbrella A) MGH Open D
NCT02880371 A Study of ARRY-382 in Combination With Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Study of ARRY-382 in Combination With Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01325441 A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies MGH Open D
NCT03273153 A Study of Cobimetinib Plus Atezolizumab Versus Pembrolizumab in Participants With Previously Untreated Advanced BRAFv600 Wild-Type Melanoma A Study of Cobimetinib Plus Atezolizumab Versus Pembrolizumab in Participants With Previously Untreated Advanced BRAFv600 Wild-Type Melanoma MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 48 Per Page:
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