Gastric/Esophageal

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Expand Collapse Gastric/Esophageal  - General Description Cancers of the stomach and esophagus, can also collectively be referred to as gastroesophageal or esophagogastric cancer. Gastric cancer incidence varies throughout the world, with a higher frequency in some countries-perhaps due to different diets or other factors. Esophageal cancers are more common in men than in women. Both alcohol use and tobacco use are associated with a higher risk of developing gastric or esophageal cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) data, 16,940 men and 15,690 women were projected to be diagnosed with gastric cancer in the United States in 2017.

Most cancers involving the esophagus or stomach are either squamous cell cancer (SCC) or adenocarcinoma. Gastric and esophageal cancers tend to develop slowly over many years in the inner mucosal layer of the stomach or esophagus. These early changes rarely cause symptoms, and therefore frequently go undetected. As esophageal and gastric cancers become more advanced, symptoms become more apparent. Once symptoms bring a patient to a doctor for medical attention, the diagnosis can be made. Thorough diagnostics are available at the MGH, initially involving an endoscopic biopsy, which is used to definitively diagnose the cancer by experienced Pathologists. Subsequent to a confirmed diagnosis, it is important to stage the cancer which includes in-depth pathology analysis, as well as a radiographic imaging procedure such as CT or PET scan. Often lymph nodes near the cancer are analysed to insure the cancer has not spread.

There has been a growing interest in the molecular features of esophageal and gastric cancers, as genetic alterations in these cancers have been identified in patients. Some genes that have been found to be involved in these two cancer types are mutations or amplification of the genes that encode HER2, MET or EGFR. Other genetic alterations have also been identified. Testing for these genetic alterations is performed in the genetics lab of the MGH, enabling physicians to utilize targeted therapies tailored for individual tumors. Treatment options for esophageal and gastric cancers are available at the MGH Cancer Center, as well as Clinical Trials testing new treatments for patients with this diagnosis.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2018
Cancers of the stomach and esophagus, can also collectively be referred to as gastroesophageal or esophagogastric cancer. Gastric cancer incidence varies throughout the world, with a higher frequency in some countries-perhaps due to different diets or other factors. Esophageal cancers are more common in men than in women. Both alcohol use and tobacco use are associated with a higher risk of developing gastric or esophageal cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) data, 16,940 men and 15,690 women were projected to be diagnosed with gastric cancer in the United States in 2017.

Most cancers involving the esophagus or stomach are either squamous cell cancer (SCC) or adenocarcinoma. Gastric and esophageal cancers tend to develop slowly over many years in the inner mucosal layer of the stomach or esophagus. These early changes rarely cause symptoms, and therefore frequently go undetected. As esophageal and gastric cancers become more advanced, symptoms become more apparent. Once symptoms bring a patient to a doctor for medical attention, the diagnosis can be made. Thorough diagnostics are available at the MGH, initially involving an endoscopic biopsy, which is used to definitively diagnose the cancer by experienced Pathologists. Subsequent to a confirmed diagnosis, it is important to stage the cancer which includes in-depth pathology analysis, as well as a radiographic imaging procedure such as CT or PET scan. Often lymph nodes near the cancer are analysed to insure the cancer has not spread.

There has been a growing interest in the molecular features of esophageal and gastric cancers, as genetic alterations in these cancers have been identified in patients. Some genes that have been found to be involved in these two cancer types are mutations or amplification of the genes that encode HER2, MET or EGFR. Other genetic alterations have also been identified. Testing for these genetic alterations is performed in the genetics lab of the MGH, enabling physicians to utilize targeted therapies tailored for individual tumors. Treatment options for esophageal and gastric cancers are available at the MGH Cancer Center, as well as Clinical Trials testing new treatments for patients with this diagnosis.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2018
Cancers of the stomach and esophagus, can also collectively be referred to as gastroesophageal or esophagogastric cancer. Gastric cancer incidence varies throughout the world, with a higher frequency in some countries-perhaps due to different diets or other factors. Esophageal cancers are more common in men than in women. Both alcohol use and tobacco use are associated with a higher risk of developing gastric or esophageal cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) data, 16,940 men and 15,690 women were projected to be diagnosed with gastric cancer in the United States in 2017.

Most cancers involving the esophagus or stomach are either squamous cell cancer (SCC) or adenocarcinoma. Gastric and esophageal cancers tend to develop slowly over many years in the inner mucosal layer of the stomach or esophagus. These early changes rarely cause symptoms, and therefore frequently go undetected. As esophageal and gastric cancers become more advanced, symptoms become more apparent. Once symptoms bring a patient to a doctor for medical attention, the diagnosis can be made. Thorough diagnostics are available at the MGH, initially involving an endoscopic biopsy, which is used to definitively diagnose the cancer by experienced Pathologists. Subsequent to a confirmed diagnosis, it is important to stage the cancer which includes in-depth pathology analysis, as well as a radiographic imaging procedure such as CT or PET scan. Often lymph nodes near the cancer are analysed to insure the cancer has not spread.

There has been a growing interest in the molecular features of esophageal and gastric cancers, as genetic alterations in these cancers have been identified in patients. Some genes that have been found to be involved in these two cancer types are mutations or amplification of the genes that encode HER2, MET or EGFR. Other genetic alterations have also been identified. Testing for these genetic alterations is performed in the genetics lab of the MGH, enabling physicians to utilize targeted therapies tailored for individual tumors. Treatment options for esophageal and gastric cancers are available at the MGH Cancer Center, as well as Clinical Trials testing new treatments for patients with this diagnosis.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2018
Cancers of the stomach and esophagus, can also collectively be referred to as gastroesophageal or esophagogastric cancer. Gastric cancer incidence varies throughout the world, with a higher frequency in some countries-perhaps due to different diets or other factors. Esophageal cancers are more common in men than in women. Both alcohol use and tobacco use are associated with a higher risk of developing gastric or esophageal cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) data, 16,940 men and 15,690 women were projected to be diagnosed with gastric cancer in the United States in 2017.

Most cancers involving the esophagus or stomach are either squamous cell cancer (SCC) or adenocarcinoma. Gastric and esophageal cancers tend to develop slowly over many years in the inner mucosal layer of the stomach or esophagus. These early changes rarely cause symptoms, and therefore frequently go undetected. As esophageal and gastric cancers become more advanced, symptoms become more apparent. Once symptoms bring a patient to a doctor for medical attention, the diagnosis can be made. Thorough diagnostics are available at the MGH, initially involving an endoscopic biopsy, which is used to definitively diagnose the cancer by experienced Pathologists. Subsequent to a confirmed diagnosis, it is important to stage the cancer which includes in-depth pathology analysis, as well as a radiographic imaging procedure such as CT or PET scan. Often lymph nodes near the cancer are analysed to insure the cancer has not spread.

There has been a growing interest in the molecular features of esophageal and gastric cancers, as genetic alterations in these cancers have been identified in patients. Some genes that have been found to be involved in these two cancer types are mutations or amplification of the genes that encode HER2, MET or EGFR. Other genetic alterations have also been identified. Testing for these genetic alterations is performed in the genetics lab of the MGH, enabling physicians to utilize targeted therapies tailored for individual tumors. Treatment options for esophageal and gastric cancers are available at the MGH Cancer Center, as well as Clinical Trials testing new treatments for patients with this diagnosis.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2018
Expand Collapse No gene selected  - General Description
Cancer research and treatments are constantly changing. Knowing the gene associated with your cancer can help doctors determine the most appropriate direction of care for you. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.

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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 24 Per Page:
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Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02099058 A Study Evaluating the Safety, Pharmacokinetics (PK), and Preliminary Efficacy of ABBV-399 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors. A Study Evaluating the Safety, Pharmacokinetics (PK), and Preliminary Efficacy of ABBV-399 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors. MGH Open D
NCT02908451 A Study of AbGn-107 in Patients With Gastric, Colorectal, or Pancreatic Cancer A Study of AbGn-107 in Patients With Gastric, Colorectal, or Pancreatic Cancer MGH Open D
NCT03013218 A Study of ALX148 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors and Lymphoma A Study of ALX148 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors and Lymphoma MGH Open D
NCT02880371 A Study of ARRY-382 in Combination With Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Study of ARRY-382 in Combination With Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT01325441 A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies MGH Open D
NCT02013154 A Study of DKN-01 in Combination With Paclitaxel or Pembrolizumab A Study of DKN-01 in Combination With Paclitaxel or Pembrolizumab MGH Open D
NCT02715531 A Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Atezolizumab Administered in Combination With Bevacizumab and/or Other Treatments in Participants With Solid Tumors A Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Atezolizumab Administered in Combination With Bevacizumab and/or Other Treatments in Participants With Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02743494 An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study of Nivolumab or Placebo in Patients With Resected Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study of Nivolumab or Placebo in Patients With Resected Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02488759 An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study to Investigate the Safety and Effectiveness of Nivolumab, and Nivolumab Combination Therapy in Virus-associated Tumors An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study to Investigate the Safety and Effectiveness of Nivolumab, and Nivolumab Combination Therapy in Virus-associated Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02903914 Arginase Inhibitor INCB001158 as a Single Agent and in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Therapy in Patients With Advanced/Metastatic Solid Tumors Arginase Inhibitor INCB001158 as a Single Agent and in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Therapy in Patients With Advanced/Metastatic Solid Tumors MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 24 Per Page:
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