Gall Bladder and Bile Duct Cancers, FGFR 1, 2, 3 and 4

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Expand Collapse Gall Bladder and Bile Duct Cancers  - General Description Gallbladder cancer and bile duct cancer arise in specific areas of the biliary tract. As a group, they are fairly rare, accounting for only 3% of gastrointestinal malignancies. Standard therapy involving surgery and/or chemotherapy can be effective if the disease is detected early. However, recurrent or advanced disease has been challenging to treat.

There have been significant advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of cancer development in biliary tract cancers, particularly those arising in the bile duct. Cholangiocarcinoma is the more common name for bile duct cancer and can occur either inside the liver (intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma) or in the part of the bile duct that lies outside the liver (extrahapatic cholangiocarcinoma). The incidence of cholangiocarcinoma is rising worldwide, possibly due to an increasing incidence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection that can cause cirrhosis of the liver.

Ongoing research has identified new potential directions for targeted therapy in cholangiocarcinoma. Researchers at the MGH discovered a subset of patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma that have a mutation in a gene called IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase). This mutation alters the normal activity of the enzyme encoded by this gene, with the resulting production of a new metabolite (2-hydroxyglutarate, or 2-HG). This 2-HG metabolite accumulates to very high levels in the tumor cells and alters how the tumor cell reads a subset of important genes in the DNA (epigenetic regulation). Furthermore, in a different subset of cholangiocarcinoma patients, a chromosomal abnormality in the gene FGFR2 has been identified. This abnormality is a fusion between part of the FGFR2 gene to part of another gene. The result is a cancer protein that constantly activates oncogenic FGFR2 signaling. The clinical utility of therapeutically targeting these tumor alterations are topics of current clinical trial investigations.

Gallbladder cancer and bile duct cancer arise in specific areas of the biliary tract. As a group, they are fairly rare, accounting for only 3% of gastrointestinal malignancies. Standard therapy involving surgery and/or chemotherapy can be effective if the disease is detected early. However, recurrent or advanced disease has been challenging to treat.

There have been significant advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis in biliary tract cancers, particularly those arising in the bile duct. Cholangiocarcinoma is the more common name for bile duct cancer and can occur either inside the liver (intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma) or in the part of the bile duct that lies outside the liver (extrahapatic cholangiocarcinoma). The incidence of cholangiocarcinoma is rising worldwide, possibly due to an increasing incidence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection that can cause cirrhosis of the liver.

Ongoing research has identified new potential directions for targeted therapy in cholangiocarcinoma. Researchers at the MGH discovered a subset of patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma that harbor a mutation in a gene called IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase). This alters the normal activity of the enzyme encoded by this gene, thereby producing a new metabolite (2-hydroxyglutarate, or 2-HG). This metabolite accumulates to very high levels in the tumor cells and alters how the tumor cell reads a subset of important genes (epigenetic regulation). Furthermore, a chromosomal abnormality in the gene FGFR2 has been identified in a subset of cholangiocarcinoma patients. This abnormality is a fusion between part of the FGFR2 gene to part of one of several other genes. The result is a cancer protein that constantly activates oncogenic FGFR2 signaling. The clinical utility of therapeutically targeting these tumor alterations are topics of current clinical trial investigations.

Gallbladder cancer and bile duct cancer arise in specific areas of the biliary tract. As a group, they are fairly rare, accounting for only 3% of gastrointestinal malignancies. Standard therapy involving surgery and/or chemotherapy can be effective if the disease is detected early. However, recurrent or advanced disease has been challenging to treat.

There have been significant advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of cancer development in biliary tract cancers, particularly those arising in the bile duct. Cholangiocarcinoma is the more common name for bile duct cancer and can occur either inside the liver (intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma) or in the part of the bile duct that lies outside the liver (extrahapatic cholangiocarcinoma). The incidence of cholangiocarcinoma is rising worldwide, possibly due to an increasing incidence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection that can cause cirrhosis of the liver.

Ongoing research has identified new potential directions for targeted therapy in cholangiocarcinoma. Researchers at the MGH discovered a subset of patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma that have a mutation in a gene called IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase). This mutation alters the normal activity of the enzyme encoded by this gene, with the resulting production of a new metabolite (2-hydroxyglutarate, or 2-HG). This 2-HG metabolite accumulates to very high levels in the tumor cells and alters how the tumor cell reads a subset of important genes in the DNA (epigenetic regulation). Furthermore, in a different subset of cholangiocarcinoma patients, a chromosomal abnormality in the gene FGFR2 has been identified. This abnormality is a fusion between part of the FGFR2 gene to part of another gene. The result is a cancer protein that constantly activates oncogenic FGFR2 signaling. The clinical utility of therapeutically targeting these tumor alterations are topics of current clinical trial investigations.

Gallbladder cancer and bile duct cancer arise in specific areas of the biliary tract. As a group, they are fairly rare, accounting for only 3% of gastrointestinal malignancies. Standard therapy involving surgery and/or chemotherapy can be effective if the disease is detected early. However, recurrent or advanced disease has been challenging to treat.

There have been significant advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis in biliary tract cancers, particularly those arising in the bile duct. Cholangiocarcinoma is the more common name for bile duct cancer and can occur either inside the liver (intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma) or in the part of the bile duct that lies outside the liver (extrahapatic cholangiocarcinoma). The incidence of cholangiocarcinoma is rising worldwide, possibly due to an increasing incidence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection that can cause cirrhosis of the liver.

Ongoing research has identified new potential directions for targeted therapy in cholangiocarcinoma. Researchers at the MGH discovered a subset of patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma that harbor a mutation in a gene called IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase). This alters the normal activity of the enzyme encoded by this gene, thereby producing a new metabolite (2-hydroxyglutarate, or 2-HG). This metabolite accumulates to very high levels in the tumor cells and alters how the tumor cell reads a subset of important genes (epigenetic regulation). Furthermore, a chromosomal abnormality in the gene FGFR2 has been identified in a subset of cholangiocarcinoma patients. This abnormality is a fusion between part of the FGFR2 gene to part of one of several other genes. The result is a cancer protein that constantly activates oncogenic FGFR2 signaling. The clinical utility of therapeutically targeting these tumor alterations are topics of current clinical trial investigations.

PubMed ID's
2083573, 20375404, 23558953, 25384085, 25608663
Expand Collapse FGFR 1, 2, 3 and 4  - General Description
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Fibroblast growth factors (FGF’s) are ligands that bind to FGF cell surface receptors (FGFR’s) and activate them. Once activated, FGFR’s on normal cells transmit a growth signal inside the cell. This growth signal is transmitted via two important pathways inside cells; the RAS-dependent MAP kinase pathway, and a second signal pathway that involves PI3K and AKT. There are four different FGFR’s that make up a family of FGFR tyrosine kinase cell surface receptors, each having an extracellular domain that binds FGF ligands, a second domain that goes through the cell outer membrane, and a third domain that is inside the cell cytoplasm (see diagram above). FGFR signaling in normal cells stimulates proliferation, differentiation, embryonic development, cell migration, survival, angiogenesis (vascularization), and organogenesis (organ development).

Recently, FGFR genetic abnormalities have been found in several types of cancer. There are four FGFR family members, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4. Alterations in FGFR genes result in dysregulated FGF receptors and can promote cancer growth and metastasis. In a recent study of almost 5000 tumors, alterations in FGFR were found in 7% of of tumors. Among these tumors, alterations were identified in all 4 FGFR’s including FGFR1 (49%), FGFR2 (19%), FGFR3 (23%), and FGFR4 (7%). A small number of the tumors had genetic alterations in more than one type of FGFR. Clearly cancers have found a way to take advantage of FGF/FGFR signaling pathway in cells to cause uncontrolled growth leading to tumors.

While the FGFR genetic abnormalities may vary in frequency depending on the group of tumor types tested, there are clearly some patterns emerging in terms of which tumor types are likely to have specific kinds of genetic alterations in FGFR 1, 2, 3 or 4. Genetic alterations in the FGFR receptors can include point mutations, insertions/deletions, gene amplification, or translocations. The sensitivity of various gene alterations to FGFR inhibition is currently under investigation. Drugs targeting the FGF/FGFR pathway include small molecule tyrosine kinases inhibitors and ligand traps.

Several pharmaceutical companies have developed drugs that target and inhibit FGFR in tumors. Some of these are designed to target multiple members of the FGFR family. At MGH and other major cancer centers, clinical trials are available to patients whose tumors have been tested and found to have genetically altered FGFR. Treatment for these patients can be available on clinical studies testing these FGFR inhibitors, including FGFR inhibitors called TAS120 and Debio 1347. Other agents such as FGF401 and BLU554 are specific for inhibiting FGFR4 and are being tested in liver cancer. Contact the MGH Cancer Center to find out more about having genetic testing performed on a tumor, or for more information about these clinical trials.

Fibroblast growth factors (FGF’s) are ligands that bind to FGF cell surface receptors (FGFR’s) and activate them. Once activated, FGFR’s on normal cells transmit a growth signal inside the cell. This growth signal is transmitted via two important pathways inside cells; the RAS-dependent MAP kinase pathway, and a second signal pathway that involves PI3K and AKT. There are four different FGFR’s that make up a family of FGFR tyrosine kinase cell surface receptors, each having an extracellular domain that binds FGF ligands, a second domain that goes through the cell outer membrane, and a third domain that is inside the cell cytoplasm (see diagram above). FGFR signaling in normal cells stimulates proliferation, differentiation, embryonic development, cell migration, survival, angiogenesis (vascularization), and organogenesis (organ development).

Recently, FGFR genetic abnormalities have been found in several types of cancer. There are four FGFR family members, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4. Alterations in FGFR genes result in dysregulated FGF receptors and can promote cancer growth and metastasis. In a recent study of almost 5000 tumors, alterations in FGFR were found in 7% of of tumors. Among these tumors, alterations were identified in all 4 FGFR’s including FGFR1 (49%), FGFR2 (19%), FGFR3 (23%), and FGFR4 (7%). A small number of the tumors had genetic alterations in more than one type of FGFR. Clearly cancers have found a way to take advantage of FGF/FGFR signaling pathway in cells to cause uncontrolled growth leading to tumors.

While the FGFR genetic abnormalities may vary in frequency depending on the group of tumor types tested, there are clearly some patterns emerging in terms of which tumor types are likely to have specific kinds of genetic alterations in FGFR 1, 2, 3 or 4. Genetic alterations in the FGFR receptors can include point mutations, insertions/deletions, gene amplification, or translocations. The sensitivity of various gene alterations to FGFR inhibition is currently under investigation. Drugs targeting the FGF/FGFR pathway include small molecule tyrosine kinases inhibitors and ligand traps.

Several pharmaceutical companies have developed drugs that target and inhibit FGFR in tumors. Some of these are designed to target multiple members of the FGFR family. At MGH and other major cancer centers, clinical trials are available to patients whose tumors have been tested and found to have genetically altered FGFR. Treatment for these patients can be available on clinical studies testing these FGFR inhibitors, including FGFR inhibitors called TAS120 and Debio 1347. Other agents such as FGF401 and BLU554 are specific for inhibiting FGFR4 and are being tested in liver cancer. Contact the MGH Cancer Center to find out more about having genetic testing performed on a tumor, or for more information about these clinical trials.

PubMed ID's
9212826, 24265351
Expand Collapse FGFR 1, 2, 3 and 4  in Gall Bladder and Bile Duct Cancers
The newest generation of genotyping platforms has recently revealed the presence of FGFR2 gene fusions in a subset of cholangiocarcinoma patients. These fusions produce a novel protein in the tumor cells that leads to constant activation of FGFR2 signaling and is thought to be an essential driver of the cancer process. New FGFR family inhibitors have been developed and there is significant interest in accruing patients with FGFR2 fusion into these early-phase clinical trials.

The newest generation of genotyping platforms has recently revealed the presence of FGFR2 gene fusions in a subset of cholangiocarcinoma patients. These fusions produce a novel protein in the tumor cells that leads to constant activation of FGFR2 signaling and is thought to be an essential driver of the cancer process. New FGFR family inhibitors have been developed and there is significant interest in accruing patients with FGFR2 fusion into these early-phase clinical trials.

PubMed ID's
24265351
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.

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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease, (G) - Gene
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 15 Per Page:
12Next »
Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT02325739 FGF401 in HCC and Solid Tumors Characterized by Positive FGFR4 and KLB Expression FGF401 in HCC and Solid Tumors Characterized by Positive FGFR4 and KLB Expression MGH Open DG
NCT02508467 A Phase 1 Study of BLU-554 in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma A Phase 1 Study of BLU-554 in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma MGH Open D
NCT02150967 A Phase II, Single Arm Study of BGJ398 in Patients With Advanced Cholangiocarcinoma A Phase II, Single Arm Study of BGJ398 in Patients With Advanced Cholangiocarcinoma MGH Open D
NCT02519348 A Study of MEDI4736 With Tremelimumab, MEDI4736 or Tremelimumab Monotherapy in Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma A Study of MEDI4736 With Tremelimumab, MEDI4736 or Tremelimumab Monotherapy in Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma MGH Open D
NCT02428712 A Study of PLX8394 as a Single Agent in Patients With Advanced Unresectable Solid Tumors A Study of PLX8394 as a Single Agent in Patients With Advanced Unresectable Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT02715531 A Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Atezolizumab Administered in Combination With Bevacizumab and/or Other Treatments in Participants With Solid Tumors A Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Atezolizumab Administered in Combination With Bevacizumab and/or Other Treatments in Participants With Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT03201458 Atezolizumab With or Without Cobimetinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Gallbladder Cancer Atezolizumab With or Without Cobimetinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Gallbladder Cancer MGH Open D
NCT02568267 Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions) Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions) MGH Open D
NCT02675946 CGX1321 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors and CGX1321 With Pembrolizumab in Subjects With Advanced GI Tumors (Keynote 596) CGX1321 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors and CGX1321 With Pembrolizumab in Subjects With Advanced GI Tumors (Keynote 596) MGH Open D
NCT03482102 Durvalumab (MEDI4736) and Tremelimumab and Radiation Therapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Biliary Tract Cancer Durvalumab (MEDI4736) and Tremelimumab and Radiation Therapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Biliary Tract Cancer MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 15 Per Page:
12Next »

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