Breast Cancer, ERBB2 (HER2)

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Expand Collapse Breast Cancer  - General Description Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline (inherited) mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer to women. In addition, women and men carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are at increased risk of developing other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available at the MGH genetics lab to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should also be referred for genetic counseling to obtain more information about the implications of inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Innovative treatments are available for patients with inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations at the MGH Cancer Center. There is also a large portfolio of clinical trials testing the newest treatments at the MGH Cancer Center.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, new therapies and treatment strategies are needed to improve outcomes for breast cancer patients. There are a number of novel targeted therapies as well as new immuno-therapies being used that are tailored to individual patient mutations at the MGH Cancer Center.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline (inherited) mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer to women. In addition, women and men carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are at increased risk of developing other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available at the MGH genetics lab to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should also be referred for genetic counseling to obtain more information about the implications of inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Innovative treatments are available for patients with inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations at the MGH Cancer Center. There is also a large portfolio of clinical trials testing the newest treatments at the MGH Cancer Center.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, new therapies and treatment strategies are needed to improve outcomes for breast cancer patients. There are a number of novel targeted therapies as well as new immuno-therapies being used that are tailored to individual patient mutations at the MGH Cancer Center.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline (inherited) mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer to women. In addition, women and men carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are at increased risk of developing other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available at the MGH genetics lab to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should also be referred for genetic counseling to obtain more information about the implications of inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Innovative treatments are available for patients with inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations at the MGH Cancer Center. There is also a large portfolio of clinical trials testing the newest treatments at the MGH Cancer Center.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, new therapies and treatment strategies are needed to improve outcomes for breast cancer patients. There are a number of novel targeted therapies as well as new immuno-therapies being used that are tailored to individual patient mutations at the MGH Cancer Center.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer among women in the United States. This year about 252,710 women in the U.S. will be told by a doctor that they have breast cancer. Half of these people will be at least 62 years old. However, an estimated 3,327,552 women are living with female breast cancer in the United States following treatment.

Germline (inherited) mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene confer an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer to women. In addition, women and men carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are at increased risk of developing other primary cancers. Genetic testing is available at the MGH genetics lab to detect mutations in members of high-risk families. Such individuals should also be referred for genetic counseling to obtain more information about the implications of inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Innovative treatments are available for patients with inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations at the MGH Cancer Center. There is also a large portfolio of clinical trials testing the newest treatments at the MGH Cancer Center.

Despite significant improvements in the treatment of breast tumors, new therapies and treatment strategies are needed to improve outcomes for breast cancer patients. There are a number of novel targeted therapies as well as new immuno-therapies being used that are tailored to individual patient mutations at the MGH Cancer Center.

Source: National Cancer Institute, 2017
Expand Collapse ERBB2 (HER2)  - General Description
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ERBB2, often called HER2, is a gene that provides the code for making a cell surface growth receptor called the ERBB2 (HER2). When certain growth factors (proteins that stimulate cell growth and division) bind to this receptor, they activate a signaling system inside the cell that ultimately promotes diverse functions such as growth, interaction and adhesion between cells, and ability of the cell to migrate within tissues. In some tumors, the activation of HER2 signaling is an important mechanism that drives the disease process. This can occur through HER2 gene amplification (the most common mechanism) or HER2 gene mutation in cancer cells.

Extra copies of the ERBB2 (HER2) gene (gene amplification) have been found in a number of different cancers. This causes the cancer cells to make excess HER2 (overexpression), which in turn, tells the cells to grow and divide in an uncontrolled manner. Genetic mutations (changes in the DNA sequence that codes the ERBB2 (HER2) protein have also been found in certain tumors.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
ERBB2, often called HER2, is a gene that provides the code for making a cell surface growth receptor called the ERBB2 (HER2). When certain growth factors (proteins that stimulate cell growth and division) bind to this receptor, they activate a signaling system inside the cell that ultimately promotes diverse functions such as growth, interaction and adhesion between cells, and ability of the cell to migrate within tissues. In some tumors, the activation of HER2 signaling is an important mechanism that drives the disease process. This can occur through HER2 gene amplification (the most common mechanism) or HER2 gene mutation in cancer cells.

Extra copies of the ERBB2 (HER2) gene (gene amplification) have been found in a number of different cancers. This causes the cancer cells to make excess HER2 (overexpression), which in turn, tells the cells to grow and divide in an uncontrolled manner. Genetic mutations (changes in the DNA sequence that codes the ERBB2 (HER2) protein have also been found in certain tumors.

Source: Genetics Home Reference
PubMed ID's
15864276, 9130710, 15457249, 16397024, 18772890, 16843263, 16988931, 22899400
Expand Collapse ERBB2 (HER2)  in Breast Cancer
HER2 overexpression, including overexpression caused by gene amplification, is a validated therapeutic target in breast cancer, with multiple matched therapies already in clinical use. In addition to those therapeutic agents approved for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer, clinical trials are now underway to study novel treatment strategies designed to prevent the acquired resistance that occurs in some patients.


HER2 overexpression, including overexpression caused by gene amplification, is a validated therapeutic target in breast cancer, with multiple matched therapies already in clinical use. In addition to those therapeutic agents approved for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer, clinical trials are now underway to study novel treatment strategies designed to prevent the acquired resistance that occurs in some patients.



PubMed ID's
16843263
Expand Collapse No mutation selected
The mutation of a gene provides clinicians with a very detailed look at your cancer. Knowing this information could change the course of your care. To learn how you can find out more about genetic testing please visit http://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/news/faq.aspx or contact the Cancer Center.
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Your Matched Clinical Trials

Trial Matches: (D) - Disease, (G) - Gene
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 53 Per Page:
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Protocol # Title Location Status Match
NCT03095352 A Randomized Phase II Study of Pembrolizumab, an Anti-PD (Programmed Cell Death)-1 Antibody, in Combination With Carboplatin Compared to Carboplatin Alone in Breast Cancer Patients With Chest Wall Disease A Randomized Phase II Study of Pembrolizumab, an Anti-PD (Programmed Cell Death)-1 Antibody, in Combination With Carboplatin Compared to Carboplatin Alone in Breast Cancer Patients With Chest Wall Disease MGH Open DG
NCT02657343 An Open-Label, Phase Ib/II Clinical Trial Of Cdk 4/6 Inhibitor, Ribociclib (Lee011), In Combination With Trastuzumab Or T-Dm1 For Advanced/Metastatic Her2-Positive Breast Cancer. An Open-Label, Phase Ib/II Clinical Trial Of Cdk 4/6 Inhibitor, Ribociclib (Lee011), In Combination With Trastuzumab Or T-Dm1 For Advanced/Metastatic Her2-Positive Breast Cancer. MGH Open DG
NCT02580448 CYP17 Lyase and Androgen Receptor Inhibitor Treatment With Seviteronel Trial (INO-VT-464-006; NCT02580448) CYP17 Lyase and Androgen Receptor Inhibitor Treatment With Seviteronel Trial (INO-VT-464-006; NCT02580448) MGH Open DG
NCT01953926 Neratinib HER Mutation Basket Study (SUMMIT) Neratinib HER Mutation Basket Study (SUMMIT) MGH Open DG
NCT02500199 Phase I Study of Pyrotinib in Patients With HER2-positive Solid Tumors Phase I Study of Pyrotinib in Patients With HER2-positive Solid Tumors MGH Open DG
NCT02952729 Study of Antibody Drug Conjugate in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer Expressing HER2 Study of Antibody Drug Conjugate in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer Expressing HER2 MGH Open DG
NCT03250676 Trial of H3B-6545, a Covalent Antagonist of Estrogen Receptor Alpha, in Women With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Estrogen Receptor-positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer Trial of H3B-6545, a Covalent Antagonist of Estrogen Receptor Alpha, in Women With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Estrogen Receptor-positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer MGH Open DG
NCT02715284 A Phase 1 Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of TSR-042, an Anti-PD-1 Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Phase 1 Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of TSR-042, an Anti-PD-1 Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT03134638 A Phase 1 Study of SY-1365 in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors A Phase 1 Study of SY-1365 in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors MGH Open D
NCT03088527 A Phase 1, First-in-Human Study of RAD140 in Postmenopausal Women With Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer A Phase 1, First-in-Human Study of RAD140 in Postmenopausal Women With Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer MGH Open D
Trial Status: Showing Results: 1-10 of 53 Per Page:
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